If laughter is the best medicine, then self advocacy may be the second best, and a U.S. physician has written a prescription for both; a book link

There are no guarantees in life except that it doesn’t end well but a physician has written a guide that may help patients navigate through the U.S. medical system. The book “Prepare to Defend Yourself . . . How to Navigate the Healthcare System & Escape with Your Life,” (2014) by Matthew Minson, MD is a patient guide written with sensitivity and humor . . . and the cartoons are funny too. [1]

The author shares the background history of medical care and addresses how changes in the current medical industry has made individualized care of patients more difficult for physicians and for patients. The guide has helpful worksheets of information to keep on hand in case of emergencies, [2], and questions to ask before an emergency occurs (ideally, get the book now, before you need it).

The book’s publication was with the support of the Texas A & M School of Rural Public Health, “whose mission is to improve the health of communities through education, research, service, outreach, and creative partnerships.” The author completed his medical residency in Anesthesiology but since then has worked extensively in the field of emergency and disaster response at federal and corporate levels. [3]

More information about the book and copies of worksheets from the book are available on the website: preparetodefendyourself.com.

Happy April Fool’s Day, but the need for self advocacy as a patient is no joke. Arm yourself with knowledge and a side of laughter, the end result will be the same but quality of life is something to protect every day.

/Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and  the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./

If laughter is the best medicine, then self advocacy may be the second best, and a U.S. physician has written a prescription for both; a book link by