Productivity and priorities

The word quickly and read a neuroscience textbook do not really belong in the same sentence, however setting a difficult goal and sticking with it, is one way to increase productivity. Prioritizing which goals are the most important and setting aside the less important ones also can help productivity. I wrote about dance in my last post but it was the neuroscience that was interesting to me – dance is a hobby for me, to help keep my body healthy, reading about nutrition and how it may help promote and preserve health across the lifespan – prenatal through aging – is my priority.

Neurocognitive/mental illness conditions are now affecting 20% of adults in the United States and 22% of young adults – when will prevention become a priority instead of simply prescribing medication or talk therapy? Our bodies and our minds are made from nutrients, and the ability to make more complex biochemicals from the simple nutrients, not from medication and talk.

The neuroscience text (1) is an overview of how the brain and nervous system works and it includes the topics that I have been working on for several years in more specific detail. It has been helpful to get a larger picture of which topics are known and which are still on the edge of research or at least not in a mainstream medical textbook yet. The textbook about Magnesium and the Central Nervous System goes into far more detail regarding the beneficial role of magnesium for preventative or acute health care treatment. (Previous post with a link to the Mg & CNS text, free pdf & more info about magnesium sources and symptoms of deficiency.)

It is true that the more you learn, the more you learn how much you or the field of study has yet to learn. Better health is my personal goal and sharing information for individual or population use is also a goal. My priorities or goals also include improving my skills academically, possibly working towards a graduate degree, and continuing with my current work in the area of nutrition and lifestyle for improving or preventing autoimmune and inflammatory conditions.

More tips for increasing productivity: (How to effectively get the right work done) and quotes about productivity: (100 Powerful Quotes that will boost your productivity.) Setting goals that are difficult but within reason, and stretching your capability to meet them is a trait found in super-productive people, see this article for other traits in common among productive people: (7 Traits of Super Productive People).

Productivity at the business level is similar and strategic vision might be comparable to goal setting for an individual. Having a clear vision that is flexible in how it will be achieved considered the rapid pace of change is recommended by Donald Sull of MIT Sloan School of Management: How to turn strategic vision into reality.

/Disclosure: This information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./

  1.  Neuroscience, 6th Edition, Editors D. Purves, G.J. Augustine, D. Fitzpatrick, W.C. Hall, A.S. LaMantia, R.D. Mooney, ML. Platt, L.E. White, (Sinauer Associates, Oxford University Press, 2018, New York) (Barnes&Noble)
  2. Lolly Daskal, How to effectively get the right work done, lollydaskal.com, https://www.lollydaskal.com/leadership/how-to-effectively-get-the-right-work-done/
  3. Lolly Daskal, 100 Powerful Quotes That Will Boost Your Productivity. lollydaskal.com, https://www.lollydaskal.com/leadership/100-powerful-quotes-that-will-boost-your-productivity/
  4. Jack Zenger, Joseph Folkman, 7 Traits of Super Productive People, April 20, 2018, Harvard Business Review, https://hbr.org/2018/04/7-traits-of-super-productive-people
  5. Kara Baskin, How to turn strategic vision into reality. March 28, 2018mitsloan.mit.edu http://mitsloan.mit.edu/newsroom/articles/how-to-turn-a-strategic-vision-into-reality/?utm_source=mitsloantwitterp&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=vision

What do daisies have to do with autism and Alzheimer’s risk?

Daisies have nothing to do with autism and Alzheimer’s risk but in order to simplify complex topics into real world strategies for preventative health care guidance the complexity has to be thoroughly understood. In the last post the medical and chemistry jargon got thicker than a field of daisies and taking a break can help the brain sort through the field to find a bouquet – metaphorically speaking.

In my real world I also found some online courses to help brush up on making sense of medical and chemical jargon for the lay reader or the health professional. I’m taking some online courses available through Coursera.org: Writing for the Sciences, Stanford University and Medical Neuroscience, Duke University, and for later in the summer: Essentials of Global Health, Yale University.

My own health has been helped by the information I gather – the bouquets of daisies can turn into good hair days and the ability to grow skin. It is easy to take health, and skin, for granted until you lose it and then a physician with a prescription pad is not always available with a helpful answer. “We don’t know what causes it or how to help you but this pain killer might leave you addicted and/or cause uncomfortable side effects” – not a helpful answer and may be a more dangerous answer than “Your lab tests are normal, why don’t you go talk to a therapist about your problems (probably psychosomatic/hypochondria).” Thanks, I’ll go for a walk and think about that, maybe I’ll be able to pick some daisies and get some fresh air and sunshine while I’m out.

Taking a break sometimes is just what is needed to allow the brain to sort through a complicated issue – the solution is there but it may need to be selected out of a field of many possible answers. Some exercise and  a little time to not think consciously about it can be what the subconscious needs to put together the pieces so the larger puzzle can be seen. (Don’t Solve Your Problems – Lolly Daskal) Taking a walk was a strategy that Charles Darwin and Charles Dickens liked to use: “If I couldn’t walk fast and far, I should just explode and perish.” – Charles Dickens – (For a More Creative Brain, Take Breaks – Inc.com) (Michael Simmons Quote)

A completed puzzle of a picture of marbles arranged in a rainbow pattern – it was more difficult than it looks.

Taking a walk may not help you solve all your tough puzzles but the exercise is still good for you.

A field of dandelions in front of a mountain (Note: Objects may be closer than they appear).

So what did daisies have to do with yesterday’s post – they represented the pause I took to let all the material that I had read settle into a few take home points about real world strategies that might help protect people with a genetic predisposition to Alzheimer’s Disease or autism – vigorous exercise regularly may help; a diet with a lower than typical balance of calories from carbohydrates versus fats and protein (30% carbohydrate calories); and occasional fasting for a day or afternoon (14) may all help the body to clear out the protein deposits that seem to collect and lead to Alzheimer’s or autism changes in the brain.

Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes. Thanks.

Inspiring Words about Peace – Kaiser Permanente Memorial Park

A memorial sculpture park was created after 9/11 by Mario Chiodo to remind us of the words and vision of peace shared by 25 great healers, leaders, writers, artists, activists from around the world. The Henry J. Kaiser Memorial Park is a sculpture park in Oakland, California includes four large works that combine words and images of the 25 leaders with 14 additional local activists including Henry J. Kaiser, founder of Kaiser Institute and Kaiser Permanente, and a fireman is included to represent the workers and others who lost their lives on 9/11/2001. The 25 heroes are also portrayed individually with one of their quotes in two rows of smaller brass sculptures and plaques.

The tragic events of September 11, 2001, compelled Mario Chiodo to create the Remember Them monument. Embedded deep within the foundation is an original steel fragment from the New York World Trade Center. A sculpted replica of the fragment is shown above. It is Mario’s hope to inspire the world to work together to turn tragedy into peace.

Remember Them – by Mario Chiodo

Remember Them – by Mario Chiodo

Remember them when you walk with freedom.

Remember them when you think of liberty.

Remember them when your children get on the school bus.

Remember them while you sleep without fear.

 

Remember them when you are hungry or lonely.

Remember them when you thirst for knowledge.

Remember them when you cannot see the light or hear the birds sing.

Remember them when you are lost and need hope.

 

Remember them when others say “You cannot . . .”

Remember them when you know you can.

Remember them when it is difficult to see the good.

 

Remember them when those less fortunate come your way.

Remember them when someone is unkind.

Remember them – forgive and be compassionate.

 

Remember them when you see injustices.

Remember them and know your voice can be heard.

Remember them and stand up for what is right.

 

Remember them and know that we are all equal.

Remember them and know that our children become what they see.

Remember them and know that your actions determine history.

 

Remember them and know that obstacles are opportunities.

Remember them and know the greatest success often comes from failure.

Remember them and know you have so much to give.

 

Remember them and walk the path of peace.

Remember them and never give up.

Remember them and reach for the stars.

Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes.