Tag Archives: magnesium deficiency

Imagine what it is like to a be person with High-Functioning Autism; a video link

Altruism can be easier if we understand that we all have differences. Some of us have more differences than others but we are all human and we all have feelings. Some of us may have difficulty with the brain handling sensations. During typical health the brain filters out background noises and helps the eyes focus on the more important areas that are in view, such as people’s faces. For people on the autistic spectrum the brain may not be able to filter out excess sensations or to focus as well on specific sights or sounds. Background noise can make conversation more difficult.

This short video presents the sensations that a child with high-functioning autism might be experiencing throughout their day — sensory overload:

Video shared on YouTube by Mark Hutten, M.A. , host of a channel dedicated to parents and their “special needs” children, and which is sponsored by Online Parent Support, LLC. The video is shared here for educational purposes without permission from Mark Hutten or the Online Parent Support, LLC, organization.

Imagine taking a shower but it hurts. In fact it feels like being caught in a hailstorm,” – I can relate to that statement and the rest of the video, at least at times when I’m more tired, stressed or undernourished. A magnesium bath can soothe the mood and the body while a shower can feel painful — to some people at least.

Being well nourished and well rested and not over-stimulated can help a person’s body and brain cope better with stimulation. People with Attention Deficit Disorder may also have problems with over-stimulation or with an increase in problem symptoms when overtired or overly hungry and blood sugar levels drop, leaving the brain without a quick source of energy. The brain needs sugar from the diet or from storage and our bodies can only store a small amount of glucose compared to fats or proteins. The protein can be converted to glucose for the brain but fats can not be reconverted into glucose for use by the brain.

Magnesium is also important throughout the brain and body and undernourishment of magnesium can cause increased  inflammatory chemicals that lead to pain and deficiency can also cause irritability. Why shower when you can take a bath?

Excerpt from an older post, Substance P, neuropathic pain, migraines, and the cannabinoid system, April 8, 20016: Time for an Epsom bath perhaps.

Epsom salt baths can be a well absorbed source of magnesium because skin absorption will bypass a problem of poor intestinal absorption of magnesium. Calcium tends to be preferentially absorbed by the intestines, especially when there is an imbalance in vitamin and hormone D levels and poor intestinal absorption of magnesium over time can easily lead to symptoms of magnesium deficiency. Symptoms of magnesium deficiency are usually labeled something else by the medical profession because the problem is not obvious on lab tests until it is quite severe because the body takes more magnesium from the bones as needed up until the point where osteoporosis is severe  enough to cause a shortage of stored magnesium.

Soaking in a bathtub for twenty minutes that has one cup of Epsom salt to a half full bathtub, and one teaspoon of a cooking vinegar such as apple cider vinegar to balance the alkalinity of the Epsom salt, can be a cure for a bad mood as well as various achy muscle cramps if magnesium deficiency is an underlying problem. Negative symptoms can occur if you stay in the bath too long. Excess magnesium absorption can cause loose watery stools for an entire day, not just once. Falling asleep in the bath can also lead to more life threatening symptoms of a weak, and fluttery heart rate, or even lead to coma and/or death — so twenty minutes to forty minutes is probably safe for a deficient person while someone who isn’t deficient might notice a weak slowing heart rate sooner than the twenty minute average that a person deficient in magnesium might find only as calming and soothing to  their mood and muscles. A person who was deficient but who then started taking the baths regularly might start noticing the weak heart rate sooner — get out of the tub then, even if its not been twenty minutes — shower and rinse time. Research on the therapeutic use of Epsom salt baths recommended one cup Epsom salt to the half full/full bath and use up to three to four times per week, but not daily.

I can’t find the actual research study among the following posts of mine (see below) but Dr. Oz has an article on the baths also and recommends the twenty minutes a few times a week also: [http://blog.doctoroz.com/oz-experts/restoring-magnesium-levels-with-epsom-salt-baths]

Previous posts on magnesium deficiency and Epsom salt baths:

1) Autistic kids wash up happier in an Epsom salt bath, .

2) Hypomagnesemia symptoms and causes list, .

3) Magnesium deficiency can cause irritability, anxiety, and chronic degeneration, .

4) Note to self: Epsom salt bath first, keyboard second; Irritability, Schizophrenia, T. gondii, and hormone D, .

/Disclaimer: This information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./

Magnesium deficiency is bad for a good mood, and can be dangerous in combination with THC

     A modern day cannibal such as the homeless man in a recent news story may not be infected with anything contagious but could be overreacting to acute magnesium deficiency. The homeless man may have been under the influence of a synthetic street drug commonly referred to as “bath salts,” a chemical substance based on the structure of the euphoric cannabinoid THC contained in medical marijuana. A study on cannabinoid effects found that research animals would kill other smaller animals when deficient in magnesium but not otherwise. Typically a mellow couch potato is the stereotype rather than raging maniac yet even mild magnesium deficiency made small doses of the THC turn the nutrient deficient animals into killers.
Education on the risks of magnesium deficiency would make a starving rage less likely to occur no matter what other chemical effects might be going on. Magnesium deficiency rage is part of the problem with alcohol abuse. Other pharmaceuticals also can deplete magnesium stores and coffee, carbonated beverages and the act of smoking also cause magnesium stores to be used for buffering the removal of waste.
The following excerpt from an endogenous cannabinoid textbook does make regulation of bath salts seem like a good idea. I am not familiar with the chemistry of the drug being sold as “bath salts” or the current news stories but I felt it necessary to mention magnesium deficiency in relation. Preventing magnesium deficiency would help prevent rage. Promoting safe access to medical marijuana products which contain a good balance of the euphoric THC and the more calming non-euphoric cannbinoids for those with documented chronic medical needs would help make a black market less profitable and reduce the risk of there even being a black market for the higher risk synthetic THC/bath salts (legal because it isn’t marijuana and is sold as “bath salts” or by some other name).
Education about stress coping skills and plenty of community support centers would help reduce demand for and support of a black market in artificial enhancements to life of whatever type – gambling, incessant video game playing or other escapes from reality.
In the excerpt below it mentions that magnesium deficiency alone could cause rodents to kill and eat other rodents. A large dose of THC given to hungry isolated rodents led to them killing other rodents when. Smaller doses of THC did not cause rodent killing unless the rodents had also been on a magnesium deficient diet for six weeks prior to the smaller dose of THC.

65. Marie-Hélène Thiébot, Frédérique Chaperon, Ester Fride, and Emmanuel S. Onaivi, Endocannabinoids : The Brain and Body’s Marijuana and Beyond, Chapter 13, Behavioral Effects of Endocannabinoids, (2006 by Taylor and Francis Group, LLC)  (p 310)

 “In isolated rats, food deprived for 22 h and then fed ad libitum for a 3-h period, a single injection of D9-THC (11 mg/kg) induced mousekilling (muricidal) behavior with enhanced aggressiveness, as indicated by the dramatic increase in the number of attacks on the dead mouse until it was completely torn in pieces (Bac et al., 1998). These authors also showed that D9-THC, at doses (2, 4, and 8 mg/kg) inactive to induce muricidal behavior in control rats, became efficient in rats suffering a magnesium (Mg2+) deprivation for 6 weeks. A severe Mg2+ deficiency (50-ppm diet) induced killing behavior by itself, and D9-THC exacerbated further attacks on the dead mouse. A moderate Mg2+-deficient diet (150-ppm) alone did not produce muricidal behavior, but all the rats became mouse killers when given D9-THC, whatever the dose. These results suggest a potentiation between both treatments to elicit aggressiveness. D9-THC would act as a trigger to induce aggression in Mg2+-deficient rats and reciprocally Mg2+ deficiency would reveal the potential neurotoxicity of a low dose of D9-THC (Bac et al., 2002).” (p310)

  • A recent study found no difference in crime statistics around medical marijuana dispensaries in the year 2009, “Report: Medical Marijuana Dispensaries Not Linked To Neighborhood Crime,” by Jason Koebler, (June 6 2012), US News: [usnews.com/news/articles/2012/06/06/report-medical-marijuana-dispensaries-not-linked-to-neighborhood-crime]
  • 2016 update – states that have legalized marijuana have not had increased crime rates due to marijuana, http://www.attn.com/stories/6042/legal-marijuana-and-crime, but there may have been an increase in traffic accidents related to marijuana use – or an increase in testing for it, more research is needed because cannabis affects the body differently between individuals and is very different than the effects of alcohol.
  • Driving under the influence of marijuana is less associated with weaving between lanes than with alcohol use and is more likely to promote driving slower than average http://www.livescience.com/54693-high-drivers-double-after-marijuana-legalization.html (which can also be dangerous if significantly slower than the flow of traffic, http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2016721/Slow-drivers-dangerous-roads-cause-crashes.html).
  • There have been an increase in emergency room visits due to marijuana products which suggests to me that strains and products are being produced that have too much THC and not enough of the non-euphoric cannabinoids that promote more of a calming and relaxing effect on the brain. This report from 2015 states a problem with increased teen use but I’ve seen other articles that suggest there hasn’t been a significant increase in use by teenagers.  http://denver.cbslocal.com/2015/09/15/feds-release-marijuana-stats-to-show-negative-effects-of-legalization/
  • THCV is one of the non-euphoric cannabinoids that help balance the stimulating effects of the euphoria producing THC. Some strains of sativa type cannabis plants contain THCV while indica strains do not. https://www.whaxy.com/learn/thcv-buffers-psychoactivity-of-thc-study.
  • Cannabinoids are made up of phospholipids and arachidonic acid or another fatty acid. The combination forms a flexible building block for cell membranes that can be released from storage when needed as an active messenger chemical. Many types of cannabinoids exist besides THC and they all have roles throughout the body’s organ systems and in every cell of the body. Some people are born with genes that don’t function normally and the inability to produce cannabinoids has been associated with eating disorders, cigarette smoking, alcohol abuse, and to a lesser extent with cocaine use and other drug use.
  • Some tips from pros in the field of weed (pun intended) for people who have over imbibed sativa and are paranoid is to first not panic, it will pass. Knowing that the symptoms are due to too much THC may help with the feelings of anxiety. Other tips include eating a little black pepper or lemon juice/lemon peel. Both substances contain terpenes that may help balance the anxiety producing aspects of some sativa strains. Eating may also help with sativa anxiety but time may be necessary for the mood to pass. Too much of an Indica strain is likely to just cause munchies, coach lock (sleepy mellowness with no interest in moving) until sleep occurs.  https://www.whaxy.com/learn/what-to-do-if-you-get-too-high.

The act of smoking in itself can lead to reduced levels of magnesium and vitamin C whether tobacco cigarettes or other herbs are being smoked. The craving for food a few hours after smoking marijuana commonly known as “the munchies” is related to a drop in magnesium levels. It is better for the brain and body to eat rather than to try to resist the messages of hunger – the body is hungry for magnesium though so choose foods that contain some such as whole grains, popcorn or corn chips, beans, nuts, seeds, potatoes or sweet potatoes, green leafy vegetables, bananas, figs, yogurt, chocolate,  and many other foods contain small amounts. https://draxe.com/magnesium-deficient-top-10-magnesium-rich-foods-must-eating/

Having a good balanced meal before consuming marijuana may also help reduce the risk of having the munchies later. And different strains of marijuana may contain more or less of certain types of cannabinoids or terpenes which may also increase appetite for other reasons than the drop in magnesium in which case, snacking on carrots and celery sticks would contain fewer calories and have less risk of leading to excess weight gain.

Another way to improve the mood if magnesium deficiency is a problem is to take a hot bath with real Epsom salt, details here: http://transcendingsquare.com/2016/07/12/nerd-does-not-stand-for-nearest-emergency-room-department/.

/Disclaimer: This information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./