Category Archives: magnesium

Chronic itch, ion channels, magnesium and calcium

Genetic differences in more than 70 genes have been associated with increased itchiness. [1] Calcium and serotonin levels may be involved in increased itch or arthritis pain signals being sent/perceived. [2] See the excerpts below:

Summary: Too much or too little calcium and magnesium can affect pain, itching, and mood. The minerals are both electrically active, and provide energy for ion channels which control the transport of messenger chemicals like serotonin across cell membranes – such as nerve cell membranes.

“For neurons to become excited, you need a receptor to communicate with an ion channel,” said Dr. Bautista. “We tried a variety of experiments and found that HTR7 communicates with the TRPA1 ion channel. Both receptors seem to be working together to mediate chronic itch.” “The researchers found more than 70 genes whose expression was higher in the more itch-sensitive mice. Of these, the gene for the HTR7 receptor was the most closely linked to itch. In fact, the HTR7 gene was twice as active in the itchiest mice compared to the least sensitive mice. ”  [1]

  1. An Itch You Just Can’t Scratch; NIH-funded study identifies proteins that may cause chronic itch (Oct. 27, 2015) http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_chronic_itch_10272015.htm
  2. Adam Horvath, et al., Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) receptor is involved in chronic arthritis: in vivo study using TRPA1-deficient mice, Arthritis Res Ther. 2016; 18: 6http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4718022/          

    Excerpt: “TRPA1 is also directly stimulated by intracellular calcium [24] and a broad range of noxious endogenous oxidative products, such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, hydrogen peroxide, hypochloride, hydrogen sulphide, 15-delta prostaglandin J2 [2528]. Furthermore, there are several exogenous irritants like mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate: AITC) [29], cinnamaldehyde [30, 31], allicin [32, 33] and formalin [34] that are known to be potent agonists of TRPA1. Inflammatory mediators, such as bradykinin and serotonin, can sensitize this receptor and increase the responsiveness of the nerve endings [19, 35]. These findings suggest that TRPA1 may be involved in the development and maintenance of arthritic pain, but the precise mechanisms are still unknown.”

  3. Rs6295: The “Single” and “Self-Transcendent” Gene (5-HT1A Receptor) https://selfhacked.com/2015/07/23/rs6295-the-single-and-self-transcendent-gene-5-ht1a-receptor/Magnesium and Calcium increase the binding of serotonin to the 5HT1A receptors in the cortex (purkinje cells). (R)

  4. Bujalska M., et. al., Magnesium ions and opioid agonist activity in streptozotocin-induced hyperalgesia. Pharmacology. 2008;82(3):180-6.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18701828

  5. That Really Does Make It Worse

    Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes.

Good news: Baths can be less exhausting than showers

Yes, autoimmune disease can be exhausting and it can be confusing for other people to understand because autoimmune disease may not have obvious symptoms. A person with an autoimmune disorder may suffer from severe pain or other symptoms throughout their body but not have lab tests that show obvious problems to a physician. Autoimmune antibodies are known for a few types of disorders and those can be screened for if the lab test is ordered but not all autoimmune antigens have been identified.

Magnesium deficiency may be an underlying issue though for many/most autoimmune disorders, so taking an Epsom salt bath can provide improved magnesium absorption through the skin and allow a person to sit down to wash their hair and shave their legs (if desired). No promises though, that a nap might not still be desired after the exertion of bathing while sitting, or before the exertion of blow-drying long hair.

Fibromyalgia and chronic pain problems may have autoimmune origins [3] and/or may have to do with our cell’s energy workhouses, the mitochondria, running out of their preferred energy source — magnesium. They use calcium but it can overwork them to the point of cell death. In normal physiology membrane transport systems, also called ion channels, carefully control how much calcium is allowed into the interior of mitochondria. Something called ruthenium-red (RuRed) and magnesium ions are involved in controlling the entry of calcium ions through the transport channels. [1, 2]

A deficiency of magnesium may allow excess calcium to enter the mitochondria and cause overexcitation and even lead to death of the mitochondria.

Mitochondria are actually similar to bacteria and have their own DNA that in nature always matches the mother’s mitochondria’s DNA but that is a different story.

(RuRed) – not a nutrient I didn’t know about – it’s a dye used in labs that selectively binds with some things but not others so it is used for identification purposes with unknown samples — roughly.

Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes.

  1. http://ajpcell.physiology.org/content/287/4/C817
  2. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/20680823_Ruthenium_red_and_magnesium_ion_partially_inhibit_silver_ion-induced_release_of_calcium_from_sarcoplasmic_reticulum_of_frog_skeletal_muscles
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24435355

Mitochondria, P53, cancer and magnesium deficiency

Addition, 7/21/16, there is more information about mitochondria and chronic illness at this link: https://www.sott.net/article/321987-Thanks-Big-Pharma-for-the-Mitochondrial-collateral-damage, the site also has a few other articles on the topic which I haven’t read yet and the topic of magnesium doesn’t come up until you reach the comment that I added. I will have to read more about this topic. Medications that cause an imbalance in calcium and magnesium could be causing stress to the mitochondria and lead to their death and to chronic illness.

  • This article is short introducing a long video. A quote from the short text does mention nutrient deficiencies can be involved, “Nutrient deficiencies are a contributing factor to mitochondrial dysfunction. ” https://www.sott.net/article/308212-Mitochondrial-dysfunction-GMOs-Glyphosate Glyphosate  Inhibition of vitamin D metabolism could lead to magnesium and  calcium imbalance which could be stressing mitochhondria and lead to chronic illness.
  • An abstract with a link to the full text: https://www.sott.net/article/264786-Oxidative-stress-mitochondrial-damage-and-neurodegenerative-diseases
  • https://www.sott.net/article/294075-Fibromyalgia-as-a-mitochondrial-disorder
  • I haven’t watched the video or read all of the articles yet but fibromyalgia is what I had symptoms of that were bad enough to lead to my giving up wheat and gluten products initially. It simply hurt too much when I ate them. And I got better without gluten. Maybe it was the gluten or maybe my genetics with errors in the vitamin D metabolism. I will have to get back to this topic but I share the information now because pain hurts and if even one person is helped then I would be glad. *And I was a professional gourmet baker, I know how to make from scratch croissant, and French baguettes and loaf breads of many types as well as cookies and quick breads. I love wheat products but they didn’t love my body.

A comment of mine that is awaiting moderation posted on another site:

Mitochondria need lots of magnesium (and magnesium is also necessary for white blood cells to be able to perform apoptosis.) “Additionally, exposure to low Mg upregulated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) [24]. PAI-1 is considered not merely a marker of senescence, since it is both necessary and sufficient for the induction of replicative senescence downstream of p53 [27].” by D. Killilea and J. Maier, “A connection between magnesium deficiency and aging: new insights from cellular studies” Magnes Res. 2008 Jun; 21(2): 77–82. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2790427/ Please U. of Penn. researchers, look into preventing cancer by providing mitochondria with a healthy diet instead of by providing them with some sort of pharmaceutical designed to manipulate P53 — just prevent P53 from being induced by providing adequate magnesium to the cells. Thanks.

The comment is in response to this article which is about recent animal based research that suggests that a cell’s mitochondria when under stress may produce a chemical (P53) that may lead to cancer: http://scienmag.com/penn-team-finds-mitochondrial-stress-induces-cancer-related-metabolic-shifts/#comment-7188

Now I know mitochondria need a lot of magnesium so one search led to the link in the comment and ~391,000 other links, https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=mitochondrial+stress+P53+calcium+magnesium, including this one:

by Giorgi C., et. al., “p53 at the endoplasmic reticulum regulates apoptosis in a Ca2+-dependent manner” PNAS, Feb. 10, 2015, vol. 112, no. 6, pp 1779–1784. http://www.pnas.org/content/112/6/1779.full.pdf

Apoptosis is the method by which white blood cells are able to kill infected or malfunctioning or old cells. Calcium and magnesium are both electrically active and can both act as signals to promote different types of cellular actions. Magnesium is most active within cellular fluid and calcium entry into cells is limited in part by ion channels that are powered by magnesium. So a magnesium deficient cell can allow too much calcium to enter the cell and within the cell calcium can cause a variety of actions and can even over activate the cell to the point of cell death. (155,000 search results for “excess calcium overworks mitochondria” :   https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=excess%20calcium%20overworks%20mitochondria  and which includes a link about the nerve degeneration disease ALS: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2933290/  so it looks like if I want to protect myself from cancer or ALS I should not stress out my mitochondria by maintaining a good intake and internal balance of both magnesium and calcium.)

Another addition to look into more at some point – P53 and apoptosis has been found to be affeected by treatment with a homeopathic preparation (which would be a completely non-toxic energy based treatment. http://www.jcimjournal.com/articles/publishArticles/pdf/S2095-4964(16)60230-3.pdf

/Disclaimer: This information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./

nErD does not stand for nearest Emergency room Department

I ran across the term nErD yesterday and I wasn’t sure what it might mean. My first thought as a health professional trained in medical acronyms was that it might have something to do with the ER or Emergency Room Department. In addition to the adult ICU (Intensive Care Unit) there is also a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) but there isn’t a neonatal emergency room department to my knowledge.

To my chagrin after a few seconds of puzzlement I noticed another reference to the term — “nerd” — and I felt like I should probably go see the movie “Revenge of the Nerds” again just as a refresher course.

Emergency Rooms have been on my mind for a while so that might explain my jumping to that idea first. At some point in the past I’ve shared this idea but I’ll reshare it because it could help provide safe and effective health care at an inexpensive price.

A patient can spend a lot of time waiting in an Emergency Department, to be seen or to be treated or for the test results to be ready or for the specialist to stop by. Some of that waiting time could be spent in a relaxing and potentially healing Epsom salt foot soak or bath.

Magnesium deficiency is estimated to be a problem for as many as 70-80% of the U.S. population. It can be an underlying factor in many chronic illnesses and chronic pain conditions and can be involved in acute substance abuse or mental health situations. A foot soak in Epsom salts can take slightly longer than a soak in an Epsom salt bath to achieve results but both can be helpful for relieving muscle cramps and some other types of pain such as migraines. Mental upset due to alcohol or other substance abuse or mental health conditions can also be soothed by soaking in Epsom salts. The amount of time to soak would vary depending on how deficient the person was in magnesium and might even be helpful as a diagnostic screening for magnesium deficiency (the mineral is largely stored within the interior of cells or within the bones so blood tests for magnesium only catch extremely severe cases of magnesium deficiency).

Excessive magnesium absorption can relax the muscles too much and may cause slowing of the heart rate and smooth muscle relaxation can also cause watery bowel movements. A hospital protocol might involve having an attendant start a patient with a non-open wound pain situation or upset mood in an Epsom salt foot soak or bath. The patient would be instructed on the early symptoms of excessive magnesium absorption and to let the attendant know if/when the first fluttery heart beats or relaxation of sphincter muscles was occurring. Typically a 20 minute Epsom salt bath is a good length of time while a forty minute bath might cause excess relaxation. Research suggested the ideal routine for a patient with difficulty absorbing magnesium from dietary sources would be approximately twenty minutes in a bath with one cup of Epsom salts every other day or three to four times per week. Taking the baths more often though can lead to symptoms of excess magnesium occurring sooner than twenty minutes, based on my personal experience with Epsom salt baths.

Alcohol and some other substances that are used excessively can cause magnesium deficiency which can cause irritability and even increase the risk for violence.

So if you or a loved one is upset or in pain that is not due to an open wound then it is possible that a trip to your bathroom for a Epsom salt bath might be soothing enough to skip a trip to the nearest Emergency room Department (you know, the nErD).

Excerpt from a previous post with more info about safely taking Epsom salt baths:

Time for an Epsom bath perhaps.

Epsom salt baths can be a well absorbed source of magnesium because skin absorption will bypass a problem of poor intestinal absorption of magnesium. Calcium tends to be preferentially absorbed by the intestines, especially when there is an imbalance in vitamin and hormone D levels and poor intestinal absorption of magnesium over time can easily lead to symptoms of magnesium deficiency. Symptoms of magnesium deficiency are usually labeled something else by the medical profession because the problem is not obvious on lab tests until it is quite severe because the body takes more magnesium from the bones as needed up until the point where osteoporosis is severe  enough to cause a shortage of stored magnesium.

Soaking in a bathtub for twenty minutes that has one cup of Epsom salt to a half full bathtub, and one teaspoon of a cooking vinegar such as apple cider vinegar to balance the alkalinity of the Epsom salt, can be a cure for a bad mood as well as various achy muscle cramps if magnesium deficiency is an underlying problem. Negative symptoms can occur if you stay in the bath too long. Excess magnesium absorption can cause loose watery stools for an entire day, not just once. Falling asleep in the bath can also lead to more life threatening symptoms of a weak, and fluttery heart rate, or even lead to coma and/or death — so twenty minutes to forty minutes is probably safe for a deficient person while someone who isn’t deficient might notice a weak slowing heart rate sooner than the twenty minute average that a person deficient in magnesium might find only as calming and soothing to  their mood and muscles. A person who was deficient but who then started taking the baths regularly might start noticing the weak heart rate sooner — get out of the tub then, even if its not been twenty minutes — shower and rinse time. Research on the therapeutic use of Epsom salt baths recommended one cup Epsom salt to the half full/full bath and use up to three to four times per week, but not daily.

I can’t find the actual research study {here it is: http://george-eby-research.com/html/absorption_of_magnesium_sulfate.pdf }  among the following posts of mine (see below) but Dr. Oz has an article on the baths also and recommends the twenty minutes a few times a week also: [http://blog.doctoroz.com/oz-experts/restoring-magnesium-levels-with-epsom-salt-baths]

Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes.

 

An article on Morgellons; a link, and a comment I added re keratinocytes

Morgellons, chapter from a book, skeptic busting or quack busting, but open-minded regarding the sufferers having a real itch problem rather than a delusional psychiatric disorder as the mainstream medical world is treating the condition. Sufferers have lost jobs due to a condition that has no physical diagnosis:[https://medium.com/matter/the-itch-nobody-can-scratch-4d980e3ac519#.tcwvu9neq]

It is horrible to have physical symptoms that are dismissed as “all in your head,” — that is no help if there is pain in your skin or under your skin.

I added a comment, slightly edited here:

Maybe they have overactive keratinocytes that produce Substance P and causes itch and neuropathic pain. Magnesium deficiency can lead to increased production of Substance P.

“Keratinocytes are able to detect itch-associated signals by expression of protease-activated receptor-2,[11] opioid,[12] cannabinoid[13] and histamine H4 receptors.[14] By responding to these signals, keratinocytes can modulate itch in many ways. For example, keratinocytes can release neurotrophins including NGF[15,16] and neurotrophin-4[17] (Fig. 1), lipid mediators[18] or endothelin-1,[19] which can either directly activate itch fibres in the skin or activate mast cells to release pruritogenic mediators. In addition, neuropeptides including substance P have been shown to significantly increase the release and production of NGF of human cultured keratinocytes, indicating a neuroimmune interaction mechanism between sensory nerves and keratinocytes[20] (Fig. 1). Interestingly, keratinocytes can also inhibit itch through the release of endocannabinoids, which bind directly to inhibitory receptors on sensory nerves.”

— so maybe the Morgellons sufferers have a defect or insufficiency in endocannabinoids. Epsom Salt baths for magnesium in case gastrointestinal absorption of magnesium is a problem might help, and supplements with phospholipids like phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylserine might help if endocannabinoid deficiency is a problem — or chocolate, rosemary and nutmeg are food sources.

Excerpt from: “Pathophysiology of Itch and New Treatments,” Ulrike Raap; Sonja Ständer; Martin Metz, Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011;11(5):420–427. [http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/749608_2]

/Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and  the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./

Links about magnesium deficiency and Substance P, a neuropeptide associated with inflammation

Magnesium is Essential for Preventing Substance P Overload , May 24, 2011, by Byron J. Richards, Board Certified Clinical Nutritionist , “Substance P is a neuropeptide that is typically ”over-heated” in situations of anxiety, depression, digestive bloating, insomnia, fibromyalgia, PTSD, and cardiovascular deterioration. New research shows that one of the first signs of magnesium deficiency1 is that it enables the over-production of substance P.” Read More:  [http://www.wellnessresources.com/health/articles/magnesium_is_essential_for_preventing_substance_p_overload/]

Raw shelled pumpkin seeds are a good source of magnesium, zinc, B vitamins and essential fatty acids. A few prenatal clients that I have worked with in the past, who were high risk due to a history of high blood pressure or pre-eclampsia during their first pregnancy, did report that the raw shelled pumpkin seeds that I had recommended they try adding to their diet during their second pregnancy did seem helpful for preventing high blood pressure or pre-eclampsia from reoccurring.  So it is also possible that raw unsalted pumpkin seeds may be a beneficial food for use during the perinatal stage for women who hope to prevent autism from developing in their infant during conception or the early weeks of pregnancy. [http://transcendingsquare.com/2014/07/24/magnesium-might-help-protect-against-beta-amyloid-placques/]

/Disclosure: This information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./

Additional notes to think more about later:

  1. Gehan A Mostafa; Laila Y AL-Ayadhi, The Possible Link Between the Elevated Serum Levels of Neurokinin A and Anti-ribosomal P Protein Antibodies in Children with Autism, J Neuroinflammation. 2011;8(180) Excerpt from the background section: “Neurogenic inflammation is orchestrated by a large number of neuropeptides. Tachykinins (substance P, neurokinin A and neurokinin B) are pro-inflammatory neuropeptides that may play an important role in some autoimmune neuroinflammatory diseases. Autoimmunity may have a role in the pathogenesis of autism in some patients.” And an excerpt from the discussion section: “In our series, increased serum levels of anti-ribosomal P protein antibodies were found in 44.3% of autistic patients. This study was the first to investigate serum levels of anti-ribosomal P protein antibodies in autistic children.” [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3261830/]
  2. Julio Hernandez, et. al., Substance P Is Responsible for Physiological Alterations Such as Increased Chloride Ion Secretion and Glucose Malabsorption in CryptosporidiosisInfect. Immun. March 2007 vol. 75 no. 3 1137-1143
    [http://iai.asm.org/content/75/3/1137.full] *Cryptosporidiosis is a parasitic infection that can be more of a risk for AIDS patients than for average people — reason unknown — The reason speculatively might be that there is a magnesium deficiency or an elevated calcium level resulting from elevated hormone D levels underlying the increased risk for crypotosporidiosis in AIDS patients.
  3. Sylke Müller1 and Barbara Kappes, Vitamin and co-factor biosynthesis pathways in Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasitesTrends Parasitol. 2007 Mar; 23(3): 112–121.
    This article is primarily about a few B vitamins and protozoan parasites but one section addresses vitamin D, Excerpt: “One way in which vitamin D3 might affect Plasmodium is through its involvement in phospholipid metabolism and signalling pathways 60. Vitamin D3 and analogues have pronounced inhibitory effects on P. falciparum erythrocytic late stage development possibly because the phospholipid biosynthesis pathways of the parasite is affected by these compounds 61. Inhibition of phospholipid biosynthesis by other classes of inhibitors (for instance choline analogues) has been followed up extensively 62, 63 and it is likely that these inhibitors will be developed as new drugs against malaria in the near future 64. Thus the activity of vitamin D3 analogues merits further attention.” [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2330093/]
  4. 60. Boyan BD, et al. 1,25-(OH)2D3 modulates growth plate chondrocytes via membrane receptor-mediated protein kinase C by a mechanism that involves changes in phospholipid metabolism and the action of arachidonic acid and PGE2. Steroids. 1999;64:129–136. [PubMed] *Roughly this title could be translated into: Hormone D affects growth plate cartilage cells by affecting the endogenous cannabinoid system, — arachidonic acid and PGE2 can be formed from cannabinoids that are released from storage within cell membranes. Elevated levels of calcium intracellularly can be a trigger signalling the release of endogenous cannbinoids from the membranes.
  5. 7. Regulation of growth plate chondrocytes and bone cells,                                        Excerpt: “In recent years it has been demonstrated that a large number of growth factors and cytokines regulate the proliferation and differentiation of bone and cartilage cells in vitro and in vivo (Table 2). This subject has been extensively reviewed (Goldring & Goldring, 1990; Canalis, McCarthy & Centrella, 1988a; Price & Russell, 1992; Martin, 1989). There is also increasing evidence that abnormal production of cytokines in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and osteoporosis may result in inappropriate responses by bone and cartilage cells. Those cytokines and growth factors considered to be of particular importance during bone development and growth include the IGFs, TGF a and b, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), FGF, PDGF and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Many of the cell types present in the microenvironment of growing bone contribute to the local synthesis of cytokines and growth factors including the resident endothelial cells, marrow stromal cells, osteoblasts, periosteal cells and chondrocytes. The haemopoetic cells present in bone marrow include circulating monocytes, macrophages and T cells; these are another potential source of cytokines. In fact, several lines of evidence point to there being a close relationship between bone cells and cells of the immune system (Skjodt & Russell, 1993).”

    7.12. Parathyroid hormone related peptide (PTHrP)

    “PTHrP is a peptide closely related to PTH that is produced by normal tissues, with similar effects to PTH on bone. It has been established as having an important role in regulating the hypercalcaemia that is associated with some malignancies (Webb et al., 1988). PTHrP has also been identified as a fetal hormone which may regulate placental calcium (Ca2+) flux (Orloff, 1989). This peptide may also have an important role in skeletal development, having been localised in embryonic bone, and a recent study has shown that mice with a defective PTHrP gene have multiple skeletal abnormalities (Karaplis et al., 1992).” [http://archive.unu.edu/unupress/food2/UID06E/UID06E0V.HTM]

  6. Arnold J. Felsenfeld, et. al., Dynamics of Parathyroid Hormone Secretion in Health and Secondary HyperparathyroidismCJASN November 2007 vol. 2no. 6 1283-1305 [http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/content/2/6/1283.full]

  7. S. C. Kukreja, et. al., Antibodies to parathyroid hormone-related protein lower serum calcium in athymic mouse models of malignancy-associated hypercalcemia due to human tumors. J Clin Invest. 1988 Nov; 82(5): 1798–1802 [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC442751/] Abstract: “A parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has recently been isolated from tumors associated with hypercalcemia. In the present study, we tested the effects of neutralizing antisera to the PTHrP on serum calcium and urine cAMP in two animal models of malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. The animal models consisted of (a) a human squamous cell lung cancer and (b) a human laryngeal cancer, both serially carried in athymic mice. The antisera specifically reduced the elevated serum calcium and urinary cAMP levels in the tumor-bearing animals. We conclude that PTHrP plays a major role in the pathogenesis of malignancy-associated hypercalcemia.”

  8. Moniz C., et. al., Parathyroid hormone-related peptide in normal human fetal development., J Mol Endocrinol. 1990 Dec;5(3):259-66. [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2288637Abstract:

    “Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) has been detected in fetal serum and amniotic fluid. Using a combination of immunocytochemistry and molecular biology we have detected the peptide and its mRNA in a variety of fetal tissues throughout gestation. Tissue-specific mRNA isoforms were observed, the pattern of hybridization of which changed throughout gestation. In addition, the intensity and pattern of immunocytochemical localization of the peptide was found to vary over the time-period studied (8-30 weeks). PTHrP is expressed by a variety of tumours associated with the syndrome of humoral hypercalcaemia of malignancy and probably accounts for the hypercalcaemia by virtue of its limited amino acid homology with parathyroid hormone. These data demonstrate for the first time that PTHrP, a tumour-related peptide, is expressed during normal human fetal development, and suggest the possibility that it may function to regulate fetal calcium balance and growth in utero.”

     

  9. “Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) can be elevated in pregnant and lactating women and in newborn infants. Nonmalignant conditions that have been described in association with elevated plasma PTHrP levels include systemic lupus erythematosus, HIV-associated lymphadenopathy, lymphedema of chest or pleural cavities, and with benign tumors of the ovary, kidney and the neuroendocrine system.” [http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/test-catalog/Clinical+and+Interpretive/81774]
  10. Shane T. Mortimer, David A. Hanley, William K. Stell, Immunohistochemical identification of calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P in nerves of the bovine parathyroid gland., Cell and Tissue Research
    , Volume 261, Issue 2, pp 339-345, [http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00318675Summary:

    “Although peptide neurotransmitters have been shown to modulate hormone secretion in many glands, there are very few studies of neurotransmitters in the parathyroid gland. Bovine parathyroid glands were collected at a local abattoir, fixed with paraformaldehyde, sectioned using a cryostat, and stained by indirect immunohistochemistry for calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P. We were able to positively identify both neuropeptides. Nerve fibres containing calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P were identified in contact with the tunica media of arteries and arterioles and dispersed throughout the stroma of the gland. While many of the fibres encircled parenchymal lobules, no intimate contact with the peripheral chief cells was observed. All immunoreactive fibres were found to contain both neuropeptides. Since calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P are vasodilators, they may increase blood flow within the gland. In addition, the neuropeptides may diffuse from perilobular nerve fibres into the parenchyma, thereby modulating secretion of parathyroid hormone.”

  11. And for the swish and score — calcitonin gene-related peptide is associated with migraine attacks — hmmmmm — health is a miracle when it works. [https://migraine.com/blog/what-is-calcitonin-gene-related-peptide-cgrp/]

Kidney dialysis may be a side effect of sugarcane production in Nicaragua; a link

Chronic kidney disease has become a problem for almost half of the adult men in Chichigalpa, Nicaragua. The disease seems to the linked to the men’s work cutting sugar cane. The exact cause of the problem is unknown but it is suspected that dehydration is a factor due to the hot working conditions with limited time for breaks. Read more: [1] Chronic kidney disease might be less of a risk associated with their jobs if sugarcane workers were allowed enough time to take breaks to prevent dehydration from occurring, as dehydration itself can cause long term harm to the kidneys. [2]

As a consumer of sugarcane products I care about whether sugarcane workers are allowed their right to protect their health during their workday. As a human I care about the worker’s pain and shortened lifespans and about their families. Chronic kidney disease and kidney dialysis treatment require the patient to follow a very restrictive diet and the treatment requires the patient to stay attached to the dialysis machine for hours every few days.  Providing adequate breaks to the workers now seems like an easier strategy in the long run, to me.

There is also a question of gender representation — Why aren’t half of the women suffering from chronic kidney failure too? If the disease was caused by something in the environment it would show up in a more even distribution, men and women would be sick in equal numbers. If the disease is associated with cutting sugarcane then maybe women aren’t getting it because more men then women are working as sugarcane cutters. Likely cutting sugarcane is very physically demanding work and male skeletal structure and muscle mass on average simply is stronger and larger than female anatomy. Machines able to navigate sugarcane fields might be invented to do the job but that solution would be taking away yet more jobs from humans and a risky job, unfortunately, is better than no job for many people because, unlike corporations, people have to eat to survive.

Working in hot conditions causes a loss of fluid and electrolytes contained in sweat and overheating may further increase the amount of sweat that is produced. Evaporation of sweat can have a cooling effect on the body. Intense physical exercise in hot and humid conditions may cause losses of up to three liters of sweat which is almost equivalent to the water content of the body’s blood supply.  [3] Workers need to have enough time to drink, eat and cool down to help prevent the risk of acute dehydration and the risk of it causing lasting damage to the kidneys.

Allowing workers frequent breaks in the shade might give their bodies time to cool down and slow down the loss of nutrients caused by excessive sweating, and allow them enough time to drink water and have a salty magnesium rich snack to replace the nutrients that were lost in sweat or used by the kidneys. The water and potassium in a piece of fruit and a salty magnesium rich snack like tortilla chips would help replace the water, sodium, potassium, and magnesium that are essential for the kidneys function. [4] The kidneys have to have enough nutrients to be able to filter out the toxins that are produced daily as a normal part of physiology and any extra toxins created by a job with hard physical labor and then still have enough nutrients to filter out any additional toxins that may have been absorbed from working around the agricultural chemicals.

4/18/2017, Update: dehydration is still suspected to be involved in the increased incidence of chronic kidney disease in agricultural workers. The problem is more widespread however than just Nicaragua. Pesticides from agriculture or silica from contaminated ground water is suspected to be involved. Use of painkillers and alcohol in the evenings combined with the limited access of water during the work day is also suspected to add to the risk of chronic kidney damage occurring.  [5]

Associations were reported with agricultural work, agrochemical exposure, dehydration, hypertension, homemade alcohol use and family history of chronic kidney disease. There is no strong evidence for a single cause, and multiple environmental, occupational and social factors are probably involved.” [6]

Part of the problem is that symptoms don’t occur until fairly serious permanent damage has developed. Earlier diagnosis by use of more frequent screening of certain lab tests may help but families need to eat and someone needs to work. Young adult sons take over when their father is no longer able to work. The disabled men are a financial and physical burden for the family and the number of widows has increased in many of the areas that have been experiencing an increase in the number of adult workers with severe chronic kidney disease. A sense of futility in the men may be part of the problem too – you can’t prevent what you don’t feel you have any control over. [5]

Preventative health care can help prevent damaging chemicals from collecting in the kidneys. And having adequate magnesium and water throughout the day and evening can help the kidneys detoxify and remove the chemicals before damage develops. Having water and some salty snacks or peanuts along with alcoholic beverages in the evening can help the body detoxify and remove the toxic effect of alcohol before it has a chance to cause damage to the kidneys either.

Agricultural companies might save money on employee turnover and sick days if they provided filtered water [8] and adequate work breaks, especially during the hottest part of the day.

A video about the condition and research regarding the increased incidence in El Salvador is available with subtitles in English, Enfermedad Renal Crónica: NefroSalva Clínico (El Salvador): [7]

/Disclosure: This information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./

  1. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/01/150129-sugarcane-workers-kidney-disease-nicaragua-health-ngfood/
  2. http://www.kidneyfailureweb.com/causes-others/767.html
  3. http://www.texasheart.org/hic/topics/hsmart/hydrate.cfm
  4. http://transcendingsquare.com/?p=967
  5.  http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/03/mysterious-kidney-disease-goes-global
  6. Associations were reported with agricultural work, agrochemical exposure, dehydration, hypertension, homemade alcohol use and family history of chronic kidney disease. There is no strong evidence for a single cause, and multiple environmental, occupational and social factors are probably involved.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24878644
  7. Enfermedad Renal Crónica: NefroSalva Clínico (El Salvador), a video from El Salvador: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tk9wcMyRG1E&feature=youtu.be
  8. 6 types of water filtering devices designed for developing nations: http://inhabitat.com/6-water-purifying-devices-for-clean-drinking-water-in-the-developing-world/

Magnesium might help protect against beta amyloid placques

Working on experimental medications for a prenatal population places the infants at risk in addition to the female patients. In my professional experience instructing clients about raw pumpkin seeds and the DASH diet frequently helped prevent preeclampsia or high blood pressure problems from reoccurring for patients with a history of having had the problem during a previous pregnancy. Pumpkin seed kernels are similar to sunflower seeds, both are good sources of magnesium and many other nutrients. The DASH diet promotes eating a serving of nuts, seeds or beans daily as a source of magnesium. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. [1]

Additional note: *Raw pumpkin seeds were my recommendation because the toasted salted ones can be very salty which would dilute the amount of magnesium naturally available in the seed compared to the large amount of sodium available from the added salt. Excess sodium can cause increased urinary losses of magnesium in the average person and may increase risk of high blood pressure in people who are salt sensitive. [5]

In a recent study conducted in 19 hypertensive patients after 2 months of adherence to a low (50 mmol/d) and high (200 mmol/d) sodium intake, the investigators observed an increase in intracellular (erythrocyte) calcium and sodium concentrations and a reduction in magnesium concentration during salt loading, primarily in salt-sensitive subjects.82 [5]

Nutritional strategies recommended to help prevent Alzheimer’s disease include increasing intake of magnesium. Research has found that low levels of magnesium promoted build up of  beta amyloid protein while high levels of magnesium promoted breakdown of the misshapen proteins.

“Lab studies show that magnesium modulates enzymes involved in amyloid beta production; at low levels, magnesium favors amyloid beta buildup, while at higher levels it favors amyloid beta breakdown.101,102″ [2]

That article also contains good news for coffee drinkers; drinking 3 to 5 cups of caffeinated coffee per day is associated with reduced risk for Alzheimer’s disease. The article suggests that the caffeine content itself seems to provide the protective effects. [2] Coffee is also a good source of magnesium, perhaps that is a coincidence. However three to five cups of coffee is more than is recommended during pregnancy; one cup per day is likely safe while six cups of coffee per day may be harmful for pregnancy. The article also recommends blueberries and curcumin (found in turmeric which is commonly used in mustard and in curry powder) which would be safe during pregnancy.

The misshapen proteins have a protective effect against bacteria and the yeast Candida albicans so a chronic lowgrade infection may be an underlying cause of the accumulation of beta amyloid placques. [3] [4]

/Disclaimer: This information is for educational or entertainment purposes, see a health professional for individual medical guidance./

Hypomagnesemia symptoms and causes list

Hypomagnesemia symptoms and causes – tables from [1, Slatoplosky, et al]

***This is an initial list of magnesium deficiency symptoms and causes. People with these conditions are at risk of chronic magnesium losses from bone stores and the resulting osteoporosis. Magnesium is used as a buffer by the kidneys and gastrointestinal tract when conditions are too acidic – frequently with our modern diet and beverages.

Magnesium supplements given orally during conditions of poor gastrointestinal absorption will be more likely to cause loose stools Magnesium ions can cause relaxation of the smooth muscles lining the intestines and watery bowel movements can occur – the common side effect is not similar to explosive diarrhea unless a very large dose is taken. Magnesium glycinate may be a better absorbed form. Lower more frequent doses are more likely to be absorbed well – 200 mg magnesium glycinate three times a day may result in more retention than 500 mg of a standard form two times a day. The RDA is lower and the UL – Upper Limit is a measly 325 mg but loose stools is really the only oral side effect. Intravenous use can be dangerous due to the rapid changes it can cause in the heart muscle that can trigger a stroke.Dosing Example for someone with a condition or medication that causes chronic wasting of magnesium stores:

“Maintenance therapy may require oral administration of Mg2+ oxide (400 mg twice daily or three times daily) for as long as the risk factors for Mg2+ deficiency exist. Oral Mg2+ gluconate (500 mg twice daily or three times daily) can also be used.” [1, p2293]

***This dosage is in reference to repletion needs for chronic magnesium deficiency typically due to decreased gastrointestinal absorption or increased renal losses.

Ideally our bodies expect a balance of magnesium in everything we eat and drink. Historically it was very rich in the water and soil and nature. An increase in insulin levels is the only main way the body can react to low magnesium levels. Historically an increased appetite would lead to increased magnesium levels because it was so common in the water and food supply. However it isn’t a primary fertilizer – the plants grow with minimal amounts and water softeners and bottling companies take it out along with the calcium and other ‘hard’ minerals. Our food supply and population is low in magnesium and when there is a high calcium intake the body loses more magnesium and preferentially absorbs the calcium. Calcium was never abundant directly in the soil and food supply – bird shells and tiny fish or animal bones would be rich sources and tiny amounts were available throughout the rest of the food and water supplies. Our bodies conserve calcium and waste magnesium because that is what used to work for us.Due to who knows what historical permutations, only sodium and potassium are officially considered electrolytes and have regulation standards for content in water supplies. The soil and everything consumed and drank was rich in magnesium ages ago as our bodies were adapting – before world flooding over the millennia washed nutrients to sea (brine pits are a source of many crucial nutrients and seaweed is a source of iodine because it filters it from the sea water – ocean vegetables for the next season are going to be contaminated from the nuclear accident).  Electrolyte beverages in our current market rarely have magnesium – the Glaceau brand of Smart Water does.

Magnesium can also be absorbed through the skin from Epsom salt baths, foot soaks or skin creams that have had it added (a compounding pharmacist can make it if prescribed). [35 B, 36 B,37 B] Magnesium has been successfully used within emergency inhalers for asthma.
____________________________________________________________________________
Clinical consequences of hypomagnesemia     [tables from 1,Slatoplosky, et al] ***symptom list
Electrolyte abnormalities
                Hypokalemia
                Hypocalcemia
Neuromuscular
                Carpopedal spasm
                Tetany
                Muscle cramps
                Muscle fasciculations
Neurologic
                Vertigo                 / dizziness
                Nystagmus           /  involuntary eye movement
                Aphasia                /  loss of speech abilities, may be temporary [12]
                Hemiparesis
                Depression
                Delirium
                Choreoathetosis    [10]
Cardiovascular
                Ventricular arrhythmias
                Torsade de points
                Supraventricular tachycardia
                Enhanced sensitivity to digoxin
Causes of Magnesium deficiency    [1]
***triggers and conditions that lead to magnesium wasting that may be genetic, pharmaceutical side effect related or possibly preventable –ie quit drinking too much alcohol –also smoking [14] needs to be added to this list [Bruerger’s vasculitis] and proton pump inhibitors for some people.
Gastrointestinal
                Malnutrition
                Malabsorption
                Chronic diarrhea
                Primary infantile hypomagnesemia
                Nasogastric suction
                Intestinal fistula
Renal
                Congenital magnesium wasting
                Bartter syndrome
                Gitelman syndrome
                Postobstructive diuresis
                Diuretic phase of ATN         [11]
                Loop and thiazide diuretics   [3,4, 5,6]
                Cisplatin
                Aminoglycosides   [7-drug names, 9 – kwashiorkor reference]
                Pentamidine
                Foscarnet
                Cyclosporin A
                Tacrolimus
Endocrine
                Hyperparathyroidism
                Hyperthyroidism
SIADH
                Hyperaldosteronism    [8 – edematous malnutrition reference]
Redistribution
                Hungry bone syndrome
                Acute pancreatitis
                Blood transfusions
                Insulin treatment
Miscellaneous
                Diabetes                   [59]
                Chronic alcoholism

“In general, Magnesium deficiency is the result of either gastrointestinal or renal losses. If no cause is readily apparent, then one can distinguish between gastrointestinal and renal losses by measuring the 24-H urinary MG²+ excretion or fractional excretion of Mg2+. The normal response of the kidney to Mg2+ depletion is to reduce Mg2+ excretion to low levels. The measurement of 24-H urinary Mg2+ excretion of  more than 30 mg in a person with normal renal function and hypomagnesemia indicates renal Mg2+ wasting. If Mg2+ deficiency is suspected in the absence of hypomagnesemia, then one might consider evaluating the renal excretion of Mg2+ in response to an intravenous Mg2+ load. [20,21] this, however, is rarely done in clinical practice. In the presence of unexplained hypocalcemia or hypokalemia, a trial of Mg2+ administration is more commonly performed.” (Slatoplosky, et al, p2292 ) [1]

/Disclaimer: Information presented on this site is not intended as a substitute for medical care and should not be considered as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment by your physician./

________________________________________________________________________________
Bibliography
1.   1.   [jasn.asnjournals.org/content/20/11/2291.long]  Kevin J. Martin,  Esther A. González and Eduardo Slatopolsky, Clinical Consequences and Management of Hypomagnesemia,  doi: 10.1681/ASN.2007111194 (JASN November 1, 2009 vol. 20 no. 11 2291-2295)
3.       Michael E. Ernst and Marvin Moser, “Use of Diuretics in Patients with Hypertension,” New England Journal of Medicine 361, no. 22 (2009): 2153-2164.

“However, thiazides are now used in substantially smaller doses, and the term low-dose thiazide has become synonymous with hydrochlorothiazide at a dose of 12.5 to 25 mg per day (or the equivalent dose of another thiazide). Approximately 50% of patients will respond initially to these low doses. In the Systolic Hypertension in the Elderly Program (SHEP),34 chlorthalidone given at a dose of 12.5 mg per day controlled blood pressure, for several years, in more than 50% of patients. Increasing the dose of hydrochlorothiazide from 12.5 to 25 mg per day may result in a response in an additional 20% (approximately) of patients; at 50 mg per day, 80 to 90% of patients should have measurable decreases in blood pressure.35 Increased electrolyte losses at the higher doses of diuretics may preclude their routine use.” [3]                      (***diabetes after a year of use is also a risk)

List of Thiazide and Thazide-like Diuretics (water pills) used in the Treatment of High Blood Pressure     4.   [infobloodpressure.com/drugs/thiazide-list.html ]
  • Bendroflumethiazide (Naturetin)
  • Benzthiazide               (Exna)
  • Chlorothalidone          (Hygroton, Thalitone)
  • Chlorothiazide            (Diurigen, Duril)
  • Hydrochlorothiazide   (Esidrix, Hydrodiuril, Hydro-Par, Microzide, Oretic)
  • Hydroflumethiazide    (Diucardin, Saluron)
  • Indapamide                 (Lozol)
  • Metolazone                 (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn, Diulo)
  • Methychothiazide       (Aquatensen, Enduron)
  • Polythiazide                (Renese)
  • Quinethazone             (Hydromax)
  • Trichlormethiazide      (Diurese, Metahydrin, Naqua)

Examples of loop diuretics include:

  • Bumetanide
  • Ethacrynic acid (Edecrin)
  • Furosemide (Lasix)
  • Torsemide (Demadex)
Aminoglycosides are a group of antibiotics including at least eight drugs: amikacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, netilmicin, paromomycin, streptomycin, and tobramycin.
7. Read more on aminoglycoside antibiotics: [healthline.com/galecontent/aminoglycosides#ixzz1HdHbebJf]
Healthline.com – Connect to Better Health

8. [icmr.nic.in/ijmr/2009/November/1128.pdf ] Tahmeed Ahmed, Sabuktagin Rahman & Alejandro Cravioto, Oedematous malnutrition,  Indian J Med Res 130, November 2009, pp 651-654

Hyperaldosteronism may be occurring in edematous malnutrition:

Anti-diuretic factor in the urine of children with nutritional oedema: Nutritional oedema is associated with an increased secretion of an anti-diuretic substance (probably anti-diuretic hormone) which prevents the normal excretory response to water administration. Gopalan and Venkatachalam15 in a study furnished indirect proof of the effect of posture on the urinary response to water load in normal subjects and in cases of nutritional oedema. The normal subjects were found to excrete over 100 per cent of ingested water within 4 h of ingestion in the recumbent posture, while in the erect posture they excreted only 80 per cent. In case of nutritional oedema, the urinary excretion was found to be much lower than in the normal subjects in both recumbent and erect postures. The effect of dietary protein deficiency on the hepatic inactivation of ADH in rats has also been investigated. It was found that the rats maintained on low-protein, low-calorie diets showed a delayed and incomplete response to a water load, and that the livers of these animals showed a reduced capacity for inactivating ADH (Gopalan & Srikantia, unpublished).

Role of ferritin and aldosterone: Srikantia observed presence of ferritin in children with kwashiorkor16. With a view to reveal the precise role of ferritin in the pathogenesis of nutritional oedema, Gopalan and Srikantia17 investigated the sequence of changes occurring in induced protein and calorie under-nutrition with focus on oedema formation in monkeys. O n the basis of the findings, they suggested that calorie-protein undernutrition leads to structural and functional changes in the liver, further leading to defective inactivation of ADH. Active ferritin is released from damaged liver leading to increased secretion of ADH. The net result is water retention. Among other factors, aldosterone, the salt retaining hormone, which is known for influencing water metabolism by altering renal tubular reabsorption of sodium, is also known to be inactivated by the liver. Altered aldosterone metabolism has been reported in diseases of the liver. Associated hyperaldosteronism could account for the sodium retention18. In oedematous children aldosterone secretion becomes higher during loss of oedema19.

“In a clinical trial, the administration of N-acetylcysteine, a glutathione precursor, resulted in more rapid resolution of oedema in kwashiorkor31. These associations between oxidative stress and kwashiorkor indicate that antioxidant depletion may cause kwashiorkor which can therefore be prevented with antioxidant supplementation.”

9. [ajcn.org/content/89/2/592.long]
Reduced production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans occurs in Zambian children with kwashiorkor but not marasmus also good –

10. Excerpt from wikipedia / Choreoathetosis 
10. [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chorea_%28disease%29]

Choreia is characterized by brief, quasi-purposeful, irregular contractions that are not repetitive or rhythmic, but appear to flow from one muscle to the next.These ‘dance-like’ movements of choreia (from the same root word as “choreography”) often occur with athetosis, which adds twisting and writhing movements.Choreia can occur in a variety of conditions and disorders.

  • Choreia is a primary feature of Huntington’s disease, a progressive neurological disorder.
  • Twenty percent of children and adolescents with rheumatic fever develop Sydenham’s chorea as a complication.
  • Choreia gravidarum is rare type of choreia which is a complication of pregnancy.
  • Choreia may also be caused by drugs (levodopa, anti-convulsants, anti-psychotics), metabolic disorders, endocrine disorders, and vascular incidents.
  • Ataxia telangiectasia
  • Wilson’s disease, a genetic disorder that leads to toxic levels of copper in the body
  • McLeod syndrome,is a genetic disorder that may affect the blood, brain, peripheral nerves, muscle and heart. Common features include peripheral neuropathy, cardiomyopathy and hemolytic anemia. Other features include limb chorea, facial tics, other oral movements (lip and tongue biting), seizures, a late-onset dementia and behavioral changes.
11. Diseases of the kidney and urinary tract  By Robert W. Schrier  page 2303 hypophosphatemia, diuretic phase of ATN, acute tubule nephropathy

Aphasia is a total or partial loss of the ability to speak correctly or to understand or comprehend what is being said. It may be caused by brain injury or disease. It’s most often caused by a stroke that injures the brain’s language center, located on the left side of the brain in most people. Some people with aphasia recover quickly and completely after a stroke. Others may have permanent speech and language problems.

  • Speech problems can range from trouble finding words to being unable to talk at all. Some stroke patients describe it as “having trouble getting words out.”
  • Some people have problems understanding what others are saying or have trouble with reading, writing or math.
  • In other cases, a person with aphasia may have trouble talking but can understand what others say perfectly.
Each person’s speech and language problem is unique. A language professional (speech therapist) can help set up a treatment plan and help others understand the needs of a person with aphasia.
For stroke information, call the American Stroke Association at 1-888-4-STROKE.
 
13. Garrison M. Tong and Robert K. Rude, “Magnesium Deficiency in Critical Illness,” Journal of Intensive Care Medicine 20, no. 1 (January): 3 -17.

14. Satoru Torii et al., “Magnesium Deficiency Causes Loss of Response to Intermittent Hypoxia in Paraganglion Cells,” Journal of Biological Chemistry 284, no. 28 (July 10, 2009): 19077 -19089. (free article)[jbc.org/content/284/28/19077.full]
*** Magnesium deficiency is found to reduce the normal response to hypoxia (lack of oxygen) of increasing adrenal gland production of erthyopoietin and endothelial vascular growth factor. This could suggest fewer red blood cells and weaker capillary and blood vessel structure in the magnesium deficient individual with breathing issues or other reduced oxygen situations (smokers).

15. “Possible Interactions with: Magnesium,” [umm.edu/altmed/articles/magnesium- 000968.htm.]

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30. Sivan Ben-Avraham et al., “Dietary strategies for patients with type 2 diabetes in the era of multi-approaches; review and results from the Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT),” Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 86 Suppl 1 (December 2009): S41-48.

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58. J D Potter, S P Robertson, and J D Johnson, “Magnesium and the regulation of muscle contraction,” Federation Proceedings 40, no. 12 (October 1981): 2653-2656.

[59.  todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/td_1104p37.shtml]

Victoria Shanta-Retelny, RD, LD, The Magnesium-Diabetes Connection, Today’s Dietitian, Vol. 6, No. 11, p. 37, November 2004

 

Magnesium references From Bibliography for Dietitian Recommends Stop Vitamin D and Calcium ASAP 
8B. http://www.ijkd.org/index.php/ijkd/article/view/140 Assadi, F., Hypomagnesemia, An Evidence-Based Approach to Clinical Cases, (Iranian Journal of Kidney Diseases, Vol 4, No 1 (2010)
18 B. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20081245 Magdalena Bujalska, Helena Makulska-Nowak, Stanis³aw W. Gumuka Magnesium ions and opioid agonistsin vincristine-induced neuropathy , Department of Pharmacodynamics, Medical University of Warsaw, Krakowskie Przedmieoecie 26/28, PL 00-927 Warszawa, Poland
19 B. Magnesium: an emerging drug in anaesthesia, , Editorial I, M. F. M. James, British Journal of Anaesthesia, 103 (4): 465-7 (2009) DOI:10.1093/bja/aep242
23 B. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17823441 Dai Q, Shrubsole MJ, Ness RM, Schlundt D, Cai Q, Smalley WE, Li M, Shyr Y, Zheng W., The relation of magnesium and calcium intakes and a genetic polymorphism in the magnesium transporter to colorectal neoplasia risk. ( Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Sep;86(3):743-51)
24 B. Joan L Caddell, Geriatric cachexia: a role for magnesium deficiency as well as for cytokines?, Letter to the Editor, , (Am J Clin Nutr 2000;;71:844-53. pp 851-853)
25 B. Carl J Johnson, M.D., Donald R. Peterson, M.D., Elizabeth K. Smith, PhD, Myocardial tissue concentrations of magnesium and potassium in men dying suddenly from ischemic heart disease, (Am J Clin Nutr 32: MAY 1979, pp 967-970)
29 B. Geeta Sharma and Charles f Stevens, A mutation that alters magnesium block of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channels, Pub: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of The United States 93.n17 (August 20, 1996): pp9259+. InfoTrac General Science Collection.
30 B. Beasley R, Aldington S, Magnesium in the treatment of asthma..Medical Research Institute of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand., Richard.Beasley@mrinz.ac.nz, Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007 Feb;7(1):107-1
32 B. Maged M. Costantine, MD, Steven J. Weiner, MS, Effects of Antenatal exposure to Magnesium Sulfate on Neuroprotection and Mortality in Preterm Infants: A Meta Analysis, Obstet Gynecol. 2009 August; 114(2 Pt 1): 354-364 DOI:10.1097/AOG0b013e3181ae98c2
33 B. Burton M. Altura, Bella T. Altura and Anthony Carella., Magnesium deficiency-induced spasms of umbilical vessels: relation to preeclampsia, hypertension, growth retardation. Pub:Science, 221 (July 22, 1983): pp376(2)
34 B. Burton M. Altura, Bella T. Altura, Asefa Gebrewold, Harmut Ising and Theo Gunther, Magnesium deficiency and hypertension: correlation between magnesium-deficient diets and microcirculatory changes in situ.,. Pub: Science, 223.(March 23, 1984): pp1315(3).
37 B. [ahavaus.com/site/dead_sea_wonders.html] Line of skin care products containing magnesium.
42 B. Magnesium intake from food and supplements is associated with bone mineral density in healthy older white subjects. (elderly health), Kathryn M. Ryder, Ronald I Shorr, Andrew J. Bush, Tamara Harris, Katie Stone and Frances A Tylavsky. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 53.11 (Nove 2005): p1875-1881. Academic One File. Web. 13 Dec. 2010
43 B. DASH Diet May Cut Heart Disease Risk, – source John Hopkins Medicine, Today’s Dietitian, Vol . 12, No. 10, Oct. 2010, p 25
44 B. Christine Feillet-Coudray, Charles Coudray, Zjean-Claude Tressol, Denise Pepin, Andrzej Mazur, Steven A Abrams, Exchangeable magnesium pool masses in healthy women: effects of magnesium supplementation, Yves Rayssiguier, Am J Clin Nutr 2002;75;72-8
45 B. [.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-2180507851.html] “Researchers Identify Protein that Regulates Magnesium and Can Restart Stem Cells.” Targeted News Service. Targeted News Service LLC. 2010. HighBeam Research. 16 Feb. 2011 . “An international team led by researchers at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School has published new findings that demonstrate how a specific protein controls the body’s ability to balance magnesium levels. Magnesium is an essential element for good health and is critical to more than 300 biochemical reactions that occur in the body. “Currently more than half of the US population does not consume an adequate amount of magnesium in their diet,” said Alexey G. Ryazanov, Ph.D., one of the study’s authors and a professor of pharmacology and member of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey at UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. “Magnesium deficiency may be associated with many medical disorders including hypertension, atherosclerosis, anxiety, asthma and a host of other disorders.” “The team of researchers from the United States, France and Poland demonstrated for the first time that a protein called TRPM7 plays a key role in the maintenance of magnesium homeostasis (balance within the body) and is essential for proliferation of embryonic stem cells.”
77 B. Neuromed Phamaceuticals and Merck and Co., Inc. Announce Agreement for Novel N-type Calcium channel Compounds, from Business Wire, March 20, 2006, High Beam Research – **Neuromed is a pharmaceutical company focusing on calcium channel blockers. “blocking pain signaling through the N-type calcium channel is a novel approach for the treatment of pain” said Christopher Gallen,MD, PhD, President and Chief Executive Officer of Neuromed. **Providing adequate magnesium would be a less novel way to block nerve pain caused by overexcitation by excess calcium. Citation #9 demonstrated that diabetic neuropathy pain could be reduced by magnesium injection alone – why bother with the opioid or the synthetic calcium channel blocker. They are an expensive and dangerous class of pharmaceuticals that would be pretty much not necessary if we weren’t being drained of magnesium reserves by excessive calcium and acidity intakes.
95 B [also 3/PPI article].     [jasn.asnjournals.org/content/20/11/2291.long]  Kevin J. Martin,  Esther A. González and Eduardo Slatopolsky, Clinical Consequences and Management of Hypomagnesemia,  doi: 10.1681/ASN.2007111194 (JASN November 1, 2009 vol. 20 no. 11 2291-2295)
96 B.    [.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2639130/?tool=pubmed] Karl T. Weber, William B. Weglicki, and Robert U. Simpson, Macro- and micronutrient dyshomeostasis in the adverse structural remodelling of myocardium,  (Cardiovasc Res. 2009 February 15; 81(3): 500–508.) Published online 2008 October 3. doi: [10.1093/cvr/cvn261].
Disclaimer: Eat to live, not eating doesn’t end well. I hope to have helped, not harmed. A blog spot is for informational purposes only and is not the same thing as individual counseling. Abruptly stopping medications can result in death. For questions about my research or to seek individual or group services please contact me at: jennyvajda@gmail.com

Autistic kids wash up happier in an Epsom salt bath

***What should autistic kids eat? For some of them weight gain is a problem and the short term answer is anything they are willing to swallow. With time and patience more variety may be accepted but the children may be avoiding some foods because they make them feel worse. forcing a “balanced diet” from all food groups may not be in their best interests. Food sensitivity testing can identify more types of sensitivities that traditional allergy tests miss.The following article provides physiologic guidance towards why some foods may be preferred or despised. Allergens can have an addictive effect due to an opioid like reaction. We can crave what is good for us but we can also crave what is bad for us – it can be exciting physiologically speaking. Some of the chemicals that build up can have neurotransmitter activity in the brain – literally over stimulating the brain cells. Can bananas and tomatoes kill brain cells? Not in everybody but maybe in autistic bodies overloaded with toxins.

Excerpts from: Autism, an extreme challenge to integrative medicine. Part II: medical management. 
by Parris M. Kidd

Magnesium sulfate (Epsom salts) can benefit the autistic child through a novel route of delivery. A parent reported her child’s oppositional behavior disappeared overnight after a bath in Epsom salts. (67) Other parents who used the treatment soon reported improvements in speech, mood, cooperation, and motor development.
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*** Over soaking in an Epsom salt/magnesium sulfate salt bath can lead to too much absorption of magnesium and produce temporary side effects of a fluttery/weak heart and possibly diarrhea. A soak for 20 minutes to 40 minutes at the very most seems an effective time for me. I use about 1-2 cups of the Epsom salt to a full bath.

I have also been adding a little vitamin C powder or spoon of cooking vinegar to balance the pH. The Epsom salt gives about an 8 pH and a 7 is more skin and hair friendly. I use pH strips to check the acidity after adding a little vitamin C powder or cooking vinegar (apple cider vinegar leaves me smelling like apple pickles). Kids and all of us love a hot bath, however warmish is better for the body than too hot. Pruney, wrinkly finger tips can be a easy sign for children to see for themselves – the body absorbed as much extra fluid as it can hold and now the skin is all ripply – cool and cold, water and cool, wrinkly fingers means its past time to get out of the tub.    [17,18: links about Epsom salt baths]
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Vitamin B6 and Magnesium (excerpt con’t, by Parris M. Kidd)
Vitamin B6, in its active form of pyridoxal-5-phosphate (P5P), is an essential cofactor for a majority of metabolic pathways of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA), dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Magnesium is an essential macronfineral required for a wide range of enzyme-catalyzed metabolic pathways. Rimland recently reviewed 18 autism studies conducted with vitamin B6, especially in combination with magnesium, (22) and concluded that all provided positive results with no significant adverse effects. While no cures of autism by vitamin B6 are known, many cases of remarkable improvement have been documented.

A 1988 paper by Rimland provided an in-depth review of the history of vitamin B6 for autism. (29) In 1966, Heeley and Roberts reported vitamin B6 corrected abnormal tryptophan metabolism in 11 of 19 autistic children. (30) In 1968, Bonisch (cited in Rimland, 1988 (29)) reported vitamin B6 (100-600 mg per day) improved behavior in 12 of 16 autistic children. According to Rimland, three of Bonisch’s subjects spoke for the first time while participating in this open trial.

After conducting an exploratory, non-controlled study in the early 1970s, (31) in 1978 Rimland published the findings from a small double-blind trial that involved 15 children with autistic symptoms. (32) In this trial only half the children involved qualified as ASD by current criteria. (32) In this crossover trial, each child received vitamin B6 at a dose of 2.5-25.1 mg/kg body weight/day (75-800 mg per day) or a placebo. Following a complex, five-phase protocol, each child continued taking whatever vitamins, minerals, or drugs they had been receiving prior to the study and the duration of B6 dosing was individualized. Rimland stated they also received “several hundred” mg per day of magnesium and a B-complex vitamin to guard against overdosing with B6. (22) Statistically significant benefits emerged from this trial, including better eye contact, less self-stimulatory behavior, more interest in surroundings, fewer tantrums, and better speech. (32) Rimland began to suspect for many children autistic symptomatology might be a type of vitamin B6 dependency syndrome. (29)

Taken together, the studies seem to establish that vitamin B6 can benefit as much as half of children and adults with autism, and that its efficacy and safety are improved when combined with magnesium. None of these studies reported any significant adverse effects, even though the vitamin B6 doses ranged as high as 1,000 mg per day. Rimland emphasized that thousands of autistic people have been taking large daily doses of vitamin B6 (as much as 1,000 mg) for decades without experiencing problems. One publication reported on seven cases of peripheral neuropathy from daily intakes of more than 2,000 mg vitamin B6. (37) These patients were not taking magnesium or other B vitamins, as usually recommended when taking large vitamin B6 doses; nor were they taking the active form–P5P–that has not been associated with toxicity. In a later study, doses of 30 mg/day of B6 as pyridoxine hydrochloride (equivalent to as much as 2,100 mg for a 70 kg adult) were administered with 10 mg/kg/day of magnesium lactate to 11 autistic children for eight weeks; behavior significantly improved and no adverse effects were evident. (38) The latest ARI parent ratings in 2002 (24) reported a B:W ratio for vitamin B6 used alone of 4.1:1, for magnesium alone 5.2:1, and for the combination of vitamin B6 plus magnesium, 11:1.

Cases of hereditary impairment of pyridoxine metabolism have been described, sometimes manifesting as seizure disorder and autism symptomatology. (39) Conversion of vitamin B6 to its active form P5P by the liver can be compromised in some autistic children. For these cases P5P supplementation may work more effectively, although hyperactivity is a possible adverse effect. (40) An intake threshold for achieving benefit may be approximately 200 mg vitamin B6 (as pyridoxine) and 100 mg magnesium per day for the 70 kg individual. (41) In any case, the cumulative results from the double-blind trials and numerous other studies and case history reports are consistent with impressive efficacy of the combination of vitamin B6 and magnesium for autism, superior to either nutrient alone. (38,42-44)

Vitamin C
Vitamin C has a reputation for its involvement in a plethora of metabolic, antioxidant, and bio-synthetic pathways, and as a cofactor for certain enzymes necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. In a double-blind trial for 30 weeks, vitamin C (8 g/70 kg body weight/day) improved total symptom severity and sensory motor scores. (50) Its current parent B:W ratio is an excellent 16:1, from 1,306 questionnaires.

(***That is an awful lot of vitamin C but it is water soluble and is not stored. We need it daily. The B vitamins are also water soluble and non-toxic. “Expensive pee” is the joke but if it is helping the body on the way through than it isn’t that expensive compared to ill health.)

Zinc
Among its many functions, zinc is needed for the development and maintenance of the brain, adrenal glands, GI tract, and immune system. Serotonin synthesis relies on zinc-activated enzymes; and zinc is also essential for antioxidant enzyme activity and other proteins important for growth and homeostasis. Breeding experiments with rodents indicate a zinc deficiency in the mother can be passed on to the offspring and negatively influence immunity and brain development. (51) Zinc currently has a very favorable B:W ratio, 17:1 from 835 questionnaires.

Zinc operates in a relationship with copper, i.e., when zinc levels go down, copper levels often go up. Bradstreet and Kartzinel assert zinc is deficient in 90 percent of ASD cases and copper in excess in 90 percent of cases. (14) Walsh analyzed copper and zinc in the blood of 318 ASD subjects and reported finding abnormally elevated copper:zinc ratios in 85 percent. (52) A smaller sampling of 22 subjects had 100-percent incidence of abnormally high, unbuffered copper (unbound to ceruloplasmin proteins)–about four times normal. Walsh’s findings corroborate recommendations by Adams (25) and others that autistics should exclude copper from their multiple vitamins.

(***Minerals can be dangerous at chronically high doses and the balance can be crucial. Wilson’s Disease is a copper overloading disease caused by a genetic defect. Pumpkin seeds, the green shelled part, are an excellant source of zinc and can be crisped by lightly toasting them in a skillet. Pepitos are another name for the Mexican snack version. Pre-toasted and salted pepitos can be quite salty unless you find raw pumpkin seeds at a health food store.)

Essential Fatty Acids Studies on EFA deficiency in autism are few, but with consistent results. Bradstreet and Kartzinel found omega-3 fatty acids are deficient in nearly 100 percent of ASD cases. (14) Vancassel and collaborators reported DHA 23-percent reduced, total omega-3s 20-percent reduced, and omega-6s unchanged in plasma phospholipids. (57) Hardy and Hardy studied 50 children with the more inclusive diagnosis Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD), and reported almost 90 percent omega-3 deficient via red cell analysis. (58)

Amino Acid Abnormalities
At least two-thirds of autistics have abnormal amino acid levels, as measured in 24-hour urine or lasting blood plasma. High phenylalanine is rarely seen (one per several thousand autistics) but can occur without overt phenylketonuria (PKU), which may be observed in children from countries that do not test for PKU at birth. High histidine (histidinuria and usually concurrent histidinemia) is seen in one per 250-500 autistics, and also can mimic autism. High urine levels of several amino acids (generalized hyperaminoaciduria) almost always indicate toxic chemical exposure and consequent liver damage. Such is also attributable to heavy metal contamination and Wilson’s disease, Fanconi syndrome, cystinosis, fructose intolerance, galactosemia, and several other hereditary disorders. (6)

Low urine threonine suggests malabsorption. In maldigestion, anserine and carnosine are high, while the essential amino acids are low. Anserine and carnosine may also be high due to zinc insufficiency. When citrulline, methionine, ethanolamine, and phosphoethanolamine are elevated, functional magnesium deficiency is likely. Elevated sarcosine indicates toxic exposures and/or folate deficiency. And, when detoxification capacity is limited, the cysteine/cystine ratio, and methionine, taurine, and glycine levels tend to be abnormal.

Amino Acid Abnormalities
Autistic subjects who poorly metabolize tryptophan can carry its potentially toxic metabolite indoylacrylic acid (IAA) in their blood. IAA would normally be detoxified by combining it with glycine to make indoylacryloylglycine (IAG). Organophosphate pesticide contamination may shunt tryptophan down the IAG pathway. (6) Tryptamine, found in tomatoes and all types of bananas, may also raise IAG levels. Certain citrus fruits also may contain tryptamine-like substances. Assays for IAG are not routinely available and are easily contaminated.

(***Tryptamine may act as a neurotransmitter and is part of tryptophan, melatonin, serotonin and the psychoactive chemical in Psilocybin mushrooms and LSD. Tomatoes and bananas may not be good for some autistic people due to an enzyme defect and removing dairy protein and wheat protein improved symptoms for up to 80% of ASD subjects.)

Removing Casein and Gluten Foods from the Diet
There is a great deal of evidence that foods containing casein or gluten contribute significantly to ASD and should be eliminated from the diet. In well-conducted studies, as many as 80 percent of ASD subjects improved following strict dietary exclusion of these proteins. (13,14) Implementation of a strict casein- and gluten-free (CFGF) diet almost always leads to symptomatic improvement, and lays the foundation for a diet that can markedly benefit the condition.

It has been suggested that the adverse brain effects associated with dietary casein and gluten are likely due to opioid-acting peptides (small amino acid polymers, also called exorphins) metabolically generated from these proteins. (15) In their Sunderland Protocol for autism, Shattock and Whiteley note that clinical improvement often occurs on the CFGF diet even when laboratory tests fail to detect such peptides in the urine. (14) They suggest autistic subjects could be biochemically processing casein and/or gluten into other bioactive derivatives not being detected; or, while urinary levels measure normal, the quantities reaching the CNS could be high, perhaps due to abnormal permeability of the blood-brain barrier. Yet another possibility they suggest is children subjected to oxygen deprivation or other perinatal brain insults may have heightened vulnerability to even “normal” levels of the offending peptides.

Reichelt et al studied 15 ASD subjects (5 girls and 10 boys, age 3-17 years) for one year after implementing casein and gluten restriction. (16) They reported that 13 of 15 showed some degree of behavioral improvement and none got worse, as judged from parent-teacher consensus. Seizure activity was decreased in 3 of 4 subjects; gross motor behavior improved in 13 of 15; social contact increased in 10 of 15; eye contact improved in 9 of 15; ritualistic behavior decreased in 8 of 11; language improved in 10 of 13; and sleep patterns normalized in 9 of 11. These investigators concluded that incomplete digestion of casein or gluten-gliadin by digestive peptidase enzymes could be a biochemical cause of autistic syndromes.

Since abrupt simultaneous removal of casein and gluten from the diet can cause withdrawal symptoms, a two-step phased withdrawal is appropriate. The first phase is removal of casein via removal of milk and other dairy products. From a 1995 trial, Lucarelli et al reported 66 percent of subjects showed benefits from this intervention. (17) Benefits can manifest quickly–usually within 2-3 days in young children or 10-14 days in adults. However, a much longer period is required for casein to be fully cleared from the body.

Shattock and Whiteley documented the known metabolic dangers to children from consuming cow’s milk. (14) Milk consumption is linked to increased autism incidence among the immigrant population in Sweden as compared to the indigenous population. (18) Some children are clearly addicted to cow’s milk and will drink large quantities. Symptoms linked to casein intake include projectile vomiting; eczema, particularly behind the knees and in the crook of the elbow; white bumps under the skin; ear discharges and infections; constipation, cramps, and/or diarrhea; and respiratory disorders resembling asthma. Shattock and Whiteley report that casein withdrawal symptoms can be severe, especially in young children. (14)

Some higher-functioning ASD children voluntarily cease casein intake, apparently sensing it is not good for them. Gluten products, on the other hand, stir strong cravings and children are less likely to refuse them. (19) Gluten exclusion requires the removal of several common cereals from the diet, wheat, barley, rye, and oats, in particular; but many other foods contain hidden gluten. (19-21) The elimination process usually takes a minimum of 3-4 weeks, and a trial period of three months is appropriate. The urinary gluten profile persists for much longer than does the casein profile, and correspondingly the withdrawal effects are usually milder in severity than casein’s, but typically more prolonged.

Full clearance of dietary casein-gluten symptoms is a long-term process. Withdrawal can be evident for three months or longer. (16) Whiteley’s group (19) found a mere 26-percent reduction in urinary levels of gluten after a five-month exclusion diet. In some cases dramatic improvement emerged a full 7-9 months after initiating the diet, but maximal improvement can require up to two years of rigid dietary exclusion. Shattock and Whiteley advise against adding these foods back into the diet, since severe opioid symptoms could result. (14)

Sensitivities to Other Foods
Whereas children with neurodevelopmental disorders frequently have sensitivities to common foods, ASD children seemingly have extreme sensitivity to a wide range of foods. These sensitivities may contribute to the perceptual and processing difficulties that typify autism, yet are difficult to objectify. The classic allergy symptoms such as stuffiness, eczema, wheezing, and itching may be absent, yet cognition and behavior remain affected. (2)

Once the main sources of food intolerance–casein, gluten, and gliadin–are removed from the diet, other foods may emerge as sources of symptoms. Parents, particularly those who keep food diaries, can often associate the child’s consumption of a particular food with deterioration in behavior, sleep patterns, or performance. Beef, pork, rice, and potatoes are only occasionally implicated; whereas, foods that consistently cause problems are eggs. tomatoes, eggplant, avocados, red peppers, soy, and corn. Seroussi (21) described how corn was revealed as a problem food only after strict removal of gluten and casein from the diet. If a particular food is suspected, it should be removed from the diet for a trial period of at least three weeks and any improvements noted. On being reintroduced into the diet, it will likely trigger an exacerbation of symptoms.

1. Kidd, Parris M.. “Autism, an extreme challenge to integrative medicine. Part II: medical management. (Autism).(Brief Article).” Alternative Medicine Review. Thorne Research Inc. 2002. HighBeam Research. 14 Mar. 2011 <http://www.highbeam.com>.

*** Chocolate is the main food eaten by one little girl with autism spectrum disorder in a later link. As a dietitian in a public health program I have worked with several autistic children and “crisp” was a popular food group. I personally love Lundberg rice cakes because they are more dense and crispy than regular store brand rice cakes. A varied diet has benefits but excluding allergens and enzymatically indigestible foods has benefit as well. The chocolate itself is a healthy start but continuing to offer variety and to enjoy variety as a role model of healthy eating generally will help a child find more foods that help more than hurt.

The tomato and banana news surprised me – I don’t eat either after my migraine history. Both were early “avoids” and since becoming less sensitive I just haven’t enjoyed them much. Dairy is a big congesting no-no for me and I still avoid gluten in general. Rice feels better, and seems to help me think and move better.

Chocolate is an excellent source of minerals and B vitamins. A hundred grams of pure dark chocolate (no sugar or cream) contains 556 calories, 136 mg magnesium, 56 mg calcium, 559 mg potassium, 8 mg iron, 2 mg zinc, 1 mg copper, 1.4 mg manganese and 3 mcg selenium. It is also a good source of B vitamins and is one of the few known sources of cannabinoids. See the page Bbliography on iodine and autism for a little more info.

2. “SWEET RACHEL LIVES ON CHOCOLATE DIET; Autism feeds plight.(News).” Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland). Media Wales Ltd. 2004. HighBeam Research. 14 Mar. 2011 <http://www.highbeam.com>.
3. “The little girl who can only eat chocolate; AUTISM GIRL’S FOOD FAD.(News).” The Mirror (London, England). Media Wales Ltd. 2004. HighBeam Research. 14 Mar. 2011 <http://www.highbeam.com>.
5. Garston, Helen. “Sad chocolate drop kid eats only 15 bags of buttons a day.(News).” The People (London, England). Media Wales Ltd. 1998. HighBeam Research. 14 Mar. 2011 <http://www.highbeam.com>.  (***This is a second chocolate eating autistic spectrum child. I’m not recommending a milk and chocolate diet. It is more an example of a craving that might have some physiologic basis.)

6. “It’s hard to cry for Kieran …we know it’s not what he would have wanted; Tribute to 10-year-old meningitis tragedy boy.(News).” Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England). Media Wales Ltd. 2011. HighBeam Research. 14 Mar. 2011 <http://www.highbeam.com>. **This is a different boy, autistic, loved chocolate, unfortunately died of meningitis.)

7. Javier Fernández-Ruiz, Rosario de Miguel, Mariluz, Hernández, Maribel Cebeira, and José A. Ramos,  Endocannabinoids : The Brain and Body’s Marijuana and Beyond, Chapter 11, Endocannabinoids and Dopamine-Related Functions in the CNS, (2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC) ,  

“Previously, the existence of anandamide analogs in chocolate had been demonstrated (di Tomaso et al., 1996). It is thought that chocolate and cocoa contain N-acylethanolamines, which are chemically and pharmacologically related to anandamide. These lipids could mimic cannabinoid ligands either directly by activating CBRs or indirectly by increasing anandamide levels (Bruinsma and Taren, 1999).”

8.  http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/cgi-bin/list_nut_edit.pl   Nutrient Data Base # 19902:  Chocolate, dark, 45- 59% cacao solids
9. http://www.health.gov/DIETARYGUIDELINES/dga2005/document/html/chapter2.html

10. “Great Culinary News for Individuals with Autism.PRWeb Newswire. Vocus PRW Holdings LLC. 2010. HighBeam Research. 14 Mar. 2011 <http://www.highbeam.com>.

11. “Easy Steps to Convert Favorite Recipes to be Gluten (and Dairy) Free.PRWeb Newswire. Vocus PRW Holdings LLC. 2010. HighBeam Research. 14 Mar. 2011 <http://www.highbeam.com>.

12. Jessica Werb. “Sick to the stomach.” The Scotsman. ECM Publishers, Inc. 2000. HighBeam Research.14 Mar. 2011 <http://www.highbeam.com>.

13. Cormier, Eileen; Jennifer Harrison Elder. “Diet and child behavior problems: fact or fiction?(Primary Care Approaches)(Clinical report).” Pediatric Nursing. American Nephrology Nurses’ Association. 2007. HighBeam Research. 14 Mar. 2011 <http://www.highbeam.com>.

14. http://www.thecrystaltarot.com/articles/nutrition-articles/autism-treatment  Treating Autism with Stem Cells, Immune Support, Nutrition and Anti-fungals., David A Steenblock, M.S., D.O.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tryptamine

15. http://www.med.umich.edu/umim/food-pyramid/dark_chocolate.html 
© copyright 2010 Regents of the University of Michigan – University of Michigan Integrative Medicine
Monica Myklebust, M.D. and Jenna Wunder, M.P.H., R.D. For questions and licensing information please call 734-998-7874 or email umim-hfp@umich.edu.
Excerpt:
The Healing Foods Pyramid™, created in 2005 and updated in 2009, is an illustration of a balanced way of eating in which food is regarded as a source of healing and nurturing rather than simply a way to gain energy.

Healing Foods Pyramid™

Dark Chocolate ImageDark Chocolate is included in the Healing Foods Pyramid™ as part of a balanced, whole foods, plant-based diet. This Food Pyramid emphasizes foods that nourish the body, sustain energy over time, contain healing qualities and essential nutrients, and support a sustainable environment.

What are the recommended servings per week?
Up to 7 ounces per week, average 1 ounce per day

16. http://magnesiumforlife.com/medical-application/magnesium-iodine-and-autism/ Magnesium, Iodine and Autism  Magnesium deficiency measured in 95% of 116 Polish children with ADHD: 78% low hair, 59% low RBC’s, 34% low serum.[7]”

17. http://magnesiumforlife.com/product-information/magnesium-chloride-vs-magnesium-sulfate/ Magnesium Chloride Vs Magnesium Sulfate  According to Daniel Reid, author of The Tao of Detox, magnesium sulfate, commonly known as Epsom salts, is rapidly excreted through the kidneys and therefore difficult to assimilate. This would explain in part why the effects from Epsom salt baths do not last long and why you need more magnesium sulfate in a bath than magnesium chloride to get similar results. Magnesium chloride is easily assimilated and metabolized in the human body.[1] However, Epsom salts are used specifically by parents of children with autism because of the sulfate, which they are usually deficient in , sulfate is also crucial to the body and is wasted in the urine of autistic children.”

/Disclaimer: This information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./