Category Archives: education

A TEDx talk about SPECT Scans and Psychiatric Diagnosis

Psychiatry is a field that relies on talking and questioning patients about their symptoms and lives for the purposes of diagnosis. A pioneer in the field has been using a method to scan the electrical activity of the brain for the purpose of more accurate diagnosis with the goal of providing more accurate treatments.

Dr. Amen shares his findings from 83,000 SPECT scans taken over many years of his clinical work helping individual patients improve their health and quality of life with individualized diagnosis and treatment recommendations. While his findings have helped many patients with a variety of conditions, autism spectrum disorders are not a primary focus of his work. The scans can help clarify diagnosis of ADHD and many other psychiatric conditions and may be helpful with autism disorders but that will likely require more time and more patients. It is a private clinic that expects payment to be paid in full at the time of the appointment. The fees may be able to be covered in part by your health insurance company but you would have to submit the bill and work with your insurance company yourself – and it may require preauthorization so check with them first if you hope for some reimbursement.

Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes.

“Yes, autistic people do have feelings”; a link

According to one writer at least, “Yes, autistic people do have feelings.” Having difficulty understanding emotions can also leave a person with less skill when trying to communicate about their emotions. The linked article explains it better than I can try to re-explain, but it struck a familiar note with me.

Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes.

A comment on fat and satiation; and MCT oil and liver mitochondria

Fat can contribute to satiation depending on the type. Saturated fats have been found to have the least impact on satiation. Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT) in a mixed meal have been found to help reduce snacking within the next hour or two. Polyunsaturated fats have been found to help reduce the amount of eating in the next meal (less eating four-five hours later). Fats in combination with fiber, especially more viscous or water-soluble fiber, also seemed to help with satiation.

Coconut oil and palm kernel oil are natural sources of MCT fats. MCT is easier to digest for people with chronic malabsorption or gallbladder issues but MCT can not be the exclusive fat source in a diet plan because excessive amounts of it can increase intestinal symptoms. MCT fats are quickly available to the liver and may help support liver mitochondrial health which may help protect the brain because in times of acute or long term starvation the liver mitochondria can produce ketones for an energy source for the brain. The brain can only use glucose or ketones for energy, it can not survive on stored fats for energy. Ketones can be made out of protein.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK53550/ – on types of fat and satiety.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3219306/ – on ketones and brain injury.
http://paleoleap.com/mct-oil-need-know/
http://bradleymartyn.com/forums/topic/choose-your-fat-sources-wisely/

(This information is for educational purposes. Please see an individual health care professional for individualized health care purposes. I am a dietitian and do not recommend or follow the Paleo diet myself but I value info when I find a source that seems well researched and is concise. )

This was written as a comment for an article on why paying more for whole foods might be more budget friendly in the long run. Tight Budget? Science Says It Still Makes Sense to Buy Pricier, Natural Foods, http://www.inc.com/tom-popomaronis/tight-budget-science-says-it-still-makes-sense-to-buy-pricier-natural-foods.html. but I couldn’t get logged in to get the comment to ‘Submit’ — so I submitted/gave up and copied it here.

An Open Letter to the President of the Royal Society and GMO Scientists; a link

For more on the history of glyphosate, and the companies involved in developing genetically modified organisms with increased tolerance to herbicides and pesticides read “An Open Letter to the President of the Royal Society and GMO Scientists,” by Rosemary Mason MB ChB FRCA (June 14, 2016) [http://rinf.com/alt-news/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Open-Letter-to-the-President-of-the-Royal-Society-and-GMO-Scientists-1.pdf]

In an independent research study on animals fed GMO foods with or without Roundup/glyphosate  chronic deficiencies in kidney function was significant in 76% of animals of either gender.  Many diseases that have become more prevalent in recent decades have also been associated with increased applications of glyphosate including: “Hypertension; stroke; diabetes, incidence & prevalence; obesity; lipoportein metabolism disorders; Alzheimer’s; senile dementia; Parkinson’s; multiple sclerosis; autism; inflammatory bowel disease; intestinal infections; end stage renal disease;  acute kidney failure; cancers of the thyroid, liver, bladder, pancreas, and kidney and myeloid leukaemia.” [http://rinf.com/alt-news/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Open-Letter-to-the-President-of-the-Royal-Society-and-GMO-Scientists-1.pdf]

A shorter overview of the article is also available here: [http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/06/17/gmos-biggest-fraud-in-the-history-of-science/]

/Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and  the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./

There is never going to be a good time to say that glyphosate is unhealthy

Business practices that are established are likely to be more difficult to change or stop than strategies that are first being introduced. And it isn’t easy to be one of the few people saying “Wait a second, there seems to be a problem.

Satire or dark humor may take a blunt look at uncomfortable reality and laugh rather than cry about the pain or feeling of futility of the situation. The Onion is a satire magazine that moved online and responds rapidly to news of the day, but sometimes with the same old story — reinforcing the feeling of futility that real world tragedy can leave: [Read more.]

Research suggests that men and women tend to communicate differently with each other and with their peers and peer groups. This tendency is discussed in the following article: [read more.] We learn from our parents and siblings but many of the lessons we learned about communication styles tend to go all the way back to the interactions and childhood games  that we played with our peers. Boys tend to play in larger groups and have a clear leader or leaders within their groups while girls tend to play in smaller groups and value working together without emphasizing any one girl as being more dominant within the group.

Observational research suggests that girls seem to value building each other up within a team while boys  seem to support having a more dominant male or small group of males that take on the decision making roles for the whole team. A group with all girls might not appreciate a girl who is more forceful about speaking up while a group with all boys might not appreciate a boy who is more forceful about speaking up if he is not within the smaller group of boys who are accepted as the leaders of the group.

There can be risks to not accepting information from people in positions of lower authority. An excerpt from the linked article is about an airplane crash that would have been easily prevented if the captain had listened more closely to his copilot’s tentative concerns about ice build up on the aircraft:

“Shortly thereafter, the plane took off, with tragic results. In other instances as well as this one, Linde observed that copilots, who are second in command, are more likely to express themselves indirectly or otherwise mitigate, or soften, their communication when they are suggesting courses of action to the pilot. In an effort to avert similar disasters, some airlines now offer training for copilots to express themselves in more assertive ways.”

“This solution seems self-evidently appropriate to most Americans. But when I assigned Linde’s article in a graduate seminar I taught, a Japanese student pointed out that it would be just as effective to train pilots to pick up on hints. This approach reflects assumptions about communication that typify Japanese culture, which places great value on the ability of people to understand one another without putting everything into words. Either directness or indirectness can be a successful means of communication as long as the linguistic style is understood by the participants.” [https://hbr.org/1995/09/the-power-of-talk-who-gets-heard-and-why]

So is our society better off when women and men in positions of lower authority are expected to hint or to suggest and cajole regarding issues they consider dangerous? Or would our society be better off if we had more of an open suggestion box where anyone could speak up and say “Danger, Will Robinson,” (to quote a robot from “Lost in Space,” wikiquote)?

So our food supply is just fine and our health care system is just fine, and vaccinations are guaranteed to be safe by our government and if there are any adverse reactions than our government will be there for individuals who apply for help (except for veterans of the Gulf War who have symptoms of the “emotional disorder” Gulf War Syndrome – a syndrome that has only occurred in American soldiers who in the early 1990s received an experimental series of vaccinations intended to protect against anthrax).

The rapidly changing rates of obesity and autism and Alzheimer’s Disease in modern society all have suggested to me for a while that something in the environment changed because the biology of a whole group doesn’t change that rapidly. Genetic adaptation as suggested by theories about evolution can occasionally have sudden changes show up in a population but more typically changes in biology are small and occur over many generations.

Around 1985 increasing rates and severity of chronic health issues started to escalate in the U.S.. The accepted reason has been attributed to people eating too much and exercising too little. So if you are one of those people who has been frustrated by stubborn health issues that don’t seem to respond to your dedicated attempts to “eat healthier and exercise more” than you may to change your definition of what eating healthier means. If avoiding glyphosate is something you’re interested or sick enough to be willing to try then avoiding the crops that use a lot of glysophate might help with weight loss by increasing your exercise too. Avoiding “corn, soy, sugar beets, canola oil, and cottonseed oil, as well as wheat and sugar cane” is enough of a challenge that your level of exercise is also likely to increase due to spending more time cooking whole foods and cleaning up afterwards. [http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/roundup-the-nontoxic-chemical-that-may-be-destroying-our-health/]

That kind of dietary change is kind of unreasonable to expect from anyone — unless they are already so sick that they are willing to try anything to feel better. Having been in that position myself though, and having helped others resolve their health issues with simple dietary changes, I have continued to share information that I’ve found helpful and strategies that I’ve found helpful.

Changing the safety rating of some of the genetically modified crops and herbicides and pesticides that are in common usage seems like it would be easier for individuals but before a problem can be solved it has to be recognized as a problem and currently our U.S. food supply is considered safe and we as a group seem to be considered unhealthy due to our own habits and possibly our emotions.

I love avoiding most of the food supply and it makes me emotionally feel very safe to enter grocery stores or to drive near agricultural fields where herbicides and pesticides might have been sprayed — not really. If you like traditional marriage and traditional genders then caring about traditional food supplies and traditional agricultural methods would probably be a good idea. Infertility is increasing along with obesity, autism and Alzheimer’s Disease so maybe we won’t have to worry about chronic health issues in children if we just stop having as many children — or maybe we’ll have a few generations with fewer children who have more severe health issues before we have to be concerned about infertility problems being severe enough to lead to no more new children being born at all.

Glysophate has been associated with male infertility and erectile dysfunction — “Danger Will Robinson,” 60-80 million couples are now having difficulties with fertility: [http://naturalsociety.com/new-study-pesticides-a-major-cause-of-infertility-male-erectile-dysfunction/]

So if you are a tourist interested in visiting the U.S. try not to worry too much about chronic health issues associated with our food supply, as a short term use may not immediately cause long term health issues – animal studies on short term use of glysophate suggested that it is safe over the short term — studies performed by the chemical company. For those of us who live here then there’s always satire.

Thank goodness it’s Friday that at least gives me something I can be thankful about.

/Disclosure: Opinions are my own and this information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./

The foods to avoid list is long but possible

Foods to avoid list from the last post: GMO “corn, soy, sugar beets, canola oil, and cottonseed oil, as well as wheat and sugar cane” by process of negative symptoms, trial and error, reading a lot and experimenting with my diet I had already stopped using all of those foods for the most part except sugar cane. I didn’t know about the use of glyphosate as a crop desiccant on sugar cane. One of the articles linked in the last post suggested that practice might be associated with the increased rate of kidney disease in sugar cane cutters that I had mentioned in an old post.  [The quote and theory about sugar cane and kidney disease is in this article: http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/roundup-the-nontoxic-chemical-that-may-be-destroying-our-health/]

I did recently increase my intake of sugar and do feel worse for it but the negative symptoms can be subtle rather than an obvious asthmatic reaction or allergic hives (weight gain was obvious though). Just changes in digestion and energy level and for me, my thyroid and lymph glands often become more swollen and painful when I’m eating more processed foods. I was sick and tired of being sick and tired for many years before reaching my 38th birthday. I’ve made a lot of changes in my diet and supplements since that age and am actually feeling better now in many ways. The age of 38 stands out in my memory because I remember thinking at that age that I felt like I was 88. I’m 50 now and no longer feel 88 — 78 maybe — actually that is just a joke, I have a lot more respect for anyone who keeps on with daily life as they get older or are struggling with chronic illness. When the body works it is a miracle and we don’t realize that when we are young (forty isn’t over the hill, it is just starting up the hill.)

This blog likely contains more than a few errors. I’ve shared information about my own health issues and things I find while reading in case it might be helpful to other individuals or be useful to research or health professionals. However I haven’t had anyone providing peer review and I’ve learned a lot since I began so the early articles often contained speculation that was resolved or answered in more recent posts. Starting over again in a more organized way is probably overdue. I started a second blog focused on autism last month but it was also supposed to be more organized too instead of just being blog articles. I haven’t gotten to writing the organized pages of diet and lifestyle strategies yet. I I haven’t even added these last few posts about autism to it either. Starting over sounds good but it is also a lot of work, leaving the old articles available, or at least some of them, may be a compromise for the meantime.

Avoiding aspartame and Neotame is hard enough, but avoiding Monsanto is more difficult. I really don’t know what we can do individually except eat more foods that are grown organically and try to vote for politicians who support organic agriculture and food processing practices.

Caution: Avoiding commonly used foods can make it more difficult to have a balanced diet. Seeking a nutritionist for help with menu planning is a good idea when many types of foods are being avoided due to allergies or food intolerance. Autoimmune flair ups may be food related but may cause less obvious symptoms than allergies and while antibody lab tests can reveal some autoimmune issues that may be related to diet the antibody lab tests and dietary changes are not commonly recommended in the current medical system.

Celiac sprue is an autoimmune disease with antibodies against gluten which is a type of protein found in wheat, barley, rye, and a few other grains. It can take patients six months of strictly avoiding even trace amounts of gluten before their antibody levels against gluten start to normalize. I’ve avoided gluten off and on for many years because it seemed to worsen fibromyalgia like pain and muscle cramps and then more recently I avoided it much more stringently because my autoimmune hyperthyroid disease seemed to become a problem only after I had started eating small amounts of gluten foods more often during a holiday season. Research suggests that the thyroid hormone is similar to gluten and an autoimmune antibody to the thyroid hormone might have developed in response to gluten sensitivity. The celiac sprue research suggested to me that avoiding gluten strictly for six months might then also help lower my thyroid antibody levels — the level did drop and my symptoms got better more quickly than the  endocrinologist expected.

Feeling better is better than feeling sick and tired of being sick and tired.

/Disclosure: Opinions are my own and this information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./

Vitamin D activating enzyme and Glyphosate, the herbicide Roundup,

The herbicide Roundup has an active ingredient, glyphosate, that has been found to inhibit the action of a group of enzymes, the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, which are important within the liver for synthesis of cholesterol products and for activation of vitamin D to the active hormone D form.

Taking megadoses of vitamin D would not help much if the body is unable to activate it to the hormone form.

Presumably glyphosate is only toxic to bacteria but our intestines and our health depend on our intestines having a healthy balance of bacteria. And more bad news, one of the few types of intestinal bacteria that are able to break down glyphosate, unfortunately are able to break it down to formaldehyde which is toxic to humans and has been associated with increased risk for developing autism. It also chelates some trace minerals including zinc and cobalt.

  • This article is long and complicated but it is written for the average reader as well as for those in academic fields. It explains the complicated chemistry of the enzyme involved in vitamin D metabolism and glysophate better than I could try to re-explain it. An excerpt of the closing paragraphs: “I also would argue that Alzheimer’s disease arises from similar pathologies as does autism, and it might be characterized as “autism for the elderly.” Therefore, its recent alarming increases may also be due predominantly to glyphosate. Glyphosate can also easily explain the obesity epidemic and depression through its disruption of the supply of tryptophan, the sole precursor to serotonin. I have shown how glyphosate disrupts both sulfate synthesis and sulfate transport, and my research has led me to believe that impaired sulfate supply to all the tissues is a common underlying pathology in most modern diseases.The best way to minimize glyphosate exposure is to adhere strictly to a completely organic diet. Most important is to avoid all the Roundup-Ready GMO crops: corn, soy, sugar beets, canola oil, and cottonseed oil, as well as wheat and sugar cane, due to desiccation practices. Any use of Roundup to kill weeds in lawn maintenance should be abandoned.” (I added the bold font): — by Seneff S., “Roundup: The “Nontoxic” Chemical that May Be Destroying our Health,” (Oct. 30, 2013)  [http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/roundup-the-nontoxic-chemical-that-may-be-destroying-our-health/]

So the preventing autism diet just got a lot more complicated – avoid all Roundup-Ready crops and crops that use Roundup as a desiccant — corn, soy, sugar beets, canola oil, and cottonseed oil, as well as wheat and sugar cane, and limit use of herbicides that contain Roundup within your home garden or lawn.

Moderation generally helps but this is a large group to have to avoid. Ending the use of the GMO crops that have been associated with negative health effects in the first place would make the question about labeling less critical or  unnecessary – in my opinion.

But if you needed some added incentive for resisting sugary foods now you can use possibly protecting yourself from Alzheimer’s Disease as a motivator to avoid sugar beets and sugar cane. Maybe it’s time for a glass of spirulina water – naturally sweet and a pretty blue-green color. (Note: Chlorella  is a type of green algae so the health benefits of spirulina and chlorella may be slightly different, in a past blog I had suggested they were likely similar but at that time I hadn’t realized that they are not both types of blue-green algae.)

Additional article on the topic of glysophate: [http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/05/14/glyphosate.aspx]

/Disclosure: Opinions are my own and this information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./

Quantum mechanics and global warming explained; video link

Just the phrase quantum mechanics may seem complicated. A brief Ted-ed video by Lieven Schiere makes the topic simple and explains how it relates to global warming. Along the way we also learn about the light spectrum that is visible to humans and which includes white light and all the colors of the rainbow. And we learn that other species can also see other types of light rays in the longer slower infrared range and the shorter faster ultraviolet range.

Ted-ed lesson How quantum mechanics explains global warming – Lieven Schiere: [http://ed.ted.com/on/iZWq8Vzd]

/Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and  the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./

Climate change is real, Exxon knew all along, now it’s time to plan and do, not just talk

Climate change has already been happening. It is past time to stop arguing about whether human activity is a cause and to start transitioning to life on a different planet. We may be uncomfortable talking about it if we feel others aren’t interested or because we don’t know much about it. [ http://michiganradio.org/post/what-keeps-people-talking-about-climate-change#stream/0 ] And we might not know much about it because we have been given misleading information about it. Some in the fossil fuel industry including Exxon has known about climate change as early as 1981 but funded disinformation research and media stories that suggested the problem wasn’t occurring or wasn’t due to human activity. [ http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jul/08/exxon-climate-change-1981-climate-denier-funding ][http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/04/06/3766659/fact-97-percent-climate-scientists-climate-change/]

There’s no time like the present, though, to start talking about it. Many people are going to be affected but in different ways around the planet.

Some areas that are already hot may become too hot for humans to live and work safely during more days of the year. The elderly and people with health problems or those working outside might be most at risk. Northern Africa and the Middle East may have greater than average increases in temperature compared to other areas around the world. Syria suffered a severe drought in 2011 which led to food shortages and may have been part of the cause of civil unrest in the nation that has led to ongoing fighting in the nation. [http://www.collective-evolution.com/2016/05/18/middle-east-and-north-africa-will-become-uninhabitable-due-to-climate-change/]

Increased health risks and crop and infrastructure damage can also result from more severe dust storms in dry climates. Areas in China have been experiencing loss of fertile land to desertification and an increase in dust storms that wind spreads to affect other areas in Asia as well. The dust can carry airborne disease risks. Erosion control grasses are being planted in some areas with desertification and duststorms.   [http://www.businessinsider.com/china-is-turning-into-a-desert-and-its-causing-problems-across-asia-2016-5]

Building more underground living spaces might help provide a cooler environment naturally and protection from a duststorm. Caves are always around 55’F after a certain depth – fact checker needs to look that up.

Flooding from melting glacier water is a risk in mountainous regions in several regions of the world. The type of flooding is called a glacial lake outburst flood (glof).  The water from the glacier melting collects in lakes at the top of mountain ridges. If too much water collects then surrounding rock and earth can break apart and the lake floods the valley below. is a risk at Thorthormi Glacial Lake in Bhutan. Work to prevent flooding has already been successful over several years of hand labor. The mountain top is too inaccessible to helicopters and unstable for large equipment. Shovels and shoulders are used to move boulders of rock or ice to make channels for the lake waters to drain through. It seems feasible that hydropower equipment could be set up downstream, further down the mountain from the hand digging crew. [http://www.worldpolicy.org/journal/summer2013/torrent-consequences ] [ http://climateriskmanagement.org/project-countries.php]

Annual crops that don’t tolerate changes in heat or rainwater can be replaced the next season with types of plants that are more likely to tolerate the more extreme weather conditions. Global warming is a less accurate term than climate change because wet areas are likely to bet wetter, with more extreme storms and flood risks, and dry areas are likely to get hotter and dryer with more risk of drought. Sensitive perennial crops like fruit trees can be affected by earlier thaws followed by refreezing temperatures. The trees blossom early and then the refreeze prevents the fruit from developing. Cherry crops have already been adversely affected by this problem. Climate change and cherries: It’s the pits, (Fe. 2, 2016) https://citizensclimatelobby.org/climate-change-and-cherries-its-the-pits/

Transition planning would suggest that it might be sensible to start planting some more heat tolerant types of fruit trees in the areas that are currently focused on cherry trees and to start some cherry orchards in more northern areas. As the planet warms the types of crops and animals that were once well suited to a region may no longer be able to survive there in a warmer or wetter or dryer climate. Animals might be able to migrate to new areas but fruit trees have to be planted.

Hotter summer temperatures also shorten the growing season for many crops. Soybeans and peanuts are more heat tolerant than corn. Sheep and goats are more heat tolerant and can survive on more sparse forage than cattle. People are moving into urban areas as their coastal or cropland becomes less hospitable but urban areas tend to have even hotter temperatures than rural areas and work may not be available. Staying put and trying to adapt to the changed climate by planting different crops or type of foraging animal might be safer and healthier than trying to migrate to a crowded city. [http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/climatechange/publication/turn-down-the-heat]

Disappearing coasts and bleached coral reefs are not the only issues to be considered. [http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/04/26/3769440/great-barrier-reef-bleaching/ ]  Fish and aquatic mammals are already having mysterious mass deaths in many areas. Increased temperatures combined with increasing acidity, lower oxygen levels and changes in salinity may all be factors — in addition to oil spills and other pollutants. Lack of fishing would further impact food supply shortages due to smaller crop yields. Planning ahead now could include more focus on soy and peanuts and other legume crops that are protein rich and heat tolerant.

The oceans act somewhat like kidneys for the planet by detoxifying the excess carbon dioxide absorbed from the atmosphere and like the lungs as part of the oxygen/carbon dioxide cycle. Carbon dioxide is absorbed from the atmosphere and oxygen is produced within the ocean largely by microbes but also algae and seaweeds. Over half of our atmosphere’s oxygen is produced by ocean plankton and other ocean microbes. That’s just a rough analogy to suggest how important a change in ocean acidity could be to the planet. It’s not just fish on our dinner plate at stake (pun not intended) or the oysters and clams on the half shell but it is also the air we breath our oxygen at stake.

This is a topic that is already impacting lives lets start planning and transitioning to the changing world using sustainable low energy cost methods. Investing in people power and working on strategies for the long term. Rafts built into designs where there’s now beachfront living would be a water-world style transition. Building things starts with ideas and eventually to blueprints and shovels.

The carbon dioxide build up will last for centuries, and increase as we keep adding more to the air. The oceans absorption of carbon dioxide reduces the level in the atmosphere and buffers changes in the global temperature but at the cost of increased  ocean acidity in addition to increased ocean temperature.

The following  is a short article but gets to the point with the title:  “We could be seeing the worst case scenario for climate change now.” [http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericmack/2016/05/18/we-could-be-living-through-the-worst-case-scenario-right-now/]

We are already near a 1.5’C average temperature increase. Coral reef bleaching is happening regularly. The glacier and ice sheet melting has been more rapid than anticipated.

Let’s start doing and planning ahead rather than talk about whether climate change exists. What caused it is still an important discussion and topic for ongoing research and data collection by teams around the world because we also need to stop adding to the problem. A 4’C increase by 2100 is predicted to have worse impact than the goal of keeping warming to 2’C but 4’C would be the estimated outcome if we continue at our current rate of carbon dioxide production.

/Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and  the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes./